GOPUSA ILLINOIS
  David John Diersen, GOPUSA Illinois Editor
      Home
      Events
      Subscribe
      2014 Clips
      2013 Clips
      2012 Clips
      2011 Clips
      2010 Clips
      11/08-12/09
      7/07-11/08
      3/07-7/07
      6/05-3/07
      Candidates
      Files
      About
      Reasons
      Articles
      Bio
      Contact
 
Weekly Poll
Welcome to CampaignSiteBuilder
February 7, 2007 News Clips
Posted by Diersen on 15-Mar-2007

FOR TEXT, SCROLL DOWN

DAILY HERALD
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Daily Herald is devastated that Cross is not interested in Hastert's seat 
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: VERY SAD: Tim Wise blames problems that minorities have on whites
(DIERSEN: Yes, racism does exist, for example, in the Chicago Office of the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO).   Because I am a white male and I opposed their giving preference to minorities and to females, my liberal Democrat GAO superiors wasted my career and forced me into early retirement.)
-- OUTSTANDING: Stop holding back Adoption and Scout license plates - State Sen. Kirk W. Dillard, Hinsdale
LAKE COUNTY NEWS SUN
-- NOT SURPRISING: Beaubien and Link predict uneasy session over state finances - Jim Newton
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/newssun/news/244500,5_1_WA06_CTYSTATELEG_S1.article
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: VERY SAD: Moderates demonize Platform Republicans calling them Extremists, again
(DIERSEN: The Republican Party exists to advance its platform which is conservative and the Democrat Party exists to advance its platform which is liberal.  Moderates reject some, many, or all the planks in the Republican platform.  Rather than demonizing Platform Republicans, rather than calling Platform Republicans Extremists, and rather than spending most if not all their time working against Platform Republicans, Moderates should form their own political party -- I suggest they call it the "Moderate Party" or the "Combine Party."  I am sure that people like Jim Edgar, Bob Kjellander, George Ryan, Jim Ryan, Jim Thompson, and Judy Baar Topinka their supporters would be more than happy to run it.) 
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
-- Legislative leaders set campaign spending records
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/245778,campaign020607.article
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Open Republican seats in the Senate and vulnerable downstate Democrat seats in the House led to about a dozen strong races instead of the usual half-dozen or so seen in recent elections. In all, the leaders pumped nearly $20 million into all the legislative races. The Democrats -- Senate President Emil Jones and House Speaker Michael Madigan -- came out on top in money and wins. They spent nearly $11 million combined, while Senate Republican Leader Frank Watson and House Republican Leader Tom Cross spent about $9 million. Democrats also came out on top in the hottest contests, winning nine of the 11 most expensive races. That gives Democrats a 37-22 ''supermajority'' in the Senate and a 66-52 lead in the House. Campaign funds controlled by the leaders accounted for more than $8.4 million -- or 52 percent -- of the $16.1 million that went into the top 11 races. The Illinois Republican Party kicked in another $944,000, bringing the percentage to 58 percent.)
-- VERY SAD: Abortion notification law on hold again - Abdon Pallasch 
-- BEYOND OUTRAGEOUS: 4 convicted pols test state law, voter mercy - Stefano Esposito and Annie Sweeney
CHICAGO TRIBUNE
-- Race, religion sensitive subtext in presidential campaign  South Side church's tenets spark criticism of Obama by some conservatives - Manya A. Brachear and Bob Secter
-- NOT SURPRISING: Governor attacks cuts to health care  Blagojevich sees threat to expanded services - Christi Parsons
ILLINOIS REVIEW
-- Debbie does... ?? - Jill Stanek
AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION OF ILLINOIS
-- VERY SAD: Federal Judge Blocks Effort to Revive Dormant Parental Notification Law 
NAPERVILLE SUN
-- DuPage Housing Authority stands to lose over $1 million in vouchers - Paige Winfield
(DIERSEN QUESTION: What percentage of housing voucher recipients blame their problems on Republicans and always vote for Democrats?)
 
GOPUSA ILLINOIS
Questions - Dave Diersen
-- Who is interested in filling the Cook County Republican Party chairman vacancy?  What are their qualifications?  What do they promise to do to build the party?  Do they support all the planks in the Illinois Republican Party (IRP) platform?  Which planks do they reject and why?  Do they call for IRP National Committeeman Bob Kjellander to resign?  Who does the Comine want to fill the vacancy? 
-- On January 13, the IRP State Central Committee (SCC) voted to prohibit the Republican Assembly of Lake County's (RALC) from using "Republican" in its name because the IRP SCC disapproved of RALC's actions.  Does the IRP SCC disapprove of George Ryan's and his supporters' actions?  Why hasn't the IRP SCC voted to prohibit George Ryan and his supporters from calling themselves Republicans?
-- The IRP says it wants conservative voters, that is, voters who support the IRP platform, back in the party, but actions speak louder than words.  Arguably, the RALC does more to help candidates who support the IRP platform than any other organization in Illinois.  When will the IRP SCC reverse its January 13 vote, apologize to the RALC, and apologize to each and every RALC member?
-- When will the IRP issue a press release on what happened at the January 13 IRP SCC meeting?
-- Kjellander rejects the IRP SCC call for him to resign, says he has "done absolutely nothing wrong," says his critics are "disgruntled," and says he is being made into a "scapegoat."  Did the Republican National Committee make Kjellander the Treasurer of its 2008 convention?  If Kjellander continues to refuse to resign as IRP National Committeeman, what should the next step be?  If/when Kjellander resigns, who would be the best person to fill the vacancyand why?
-- What should the IRP SCC do to discourage Republican candidates, Republican elected officials, and especially Republican party leaders from praising Democrat candidates, Democrat elected officials, and Democrat party leaders, especially from praising extremely liberal Democrats like Obama?
 
What saddens, de-motivates, and/or irritates Illinois "Platform" Republicans more? - Dave Diersen
-- The IRP's efforts to punish the RALC, and therefore, to punish RALC's members
-- The IRP's failure do more to encourage Kjellander to resign
-- The punishment and/or demonization of those who come to RALC's defense and/or call for Kjellander to resign
-- Republican candidates, elected officials, and party leaders who praise Obama and/or publicly reject the platform
 
DAILY HERALD
DIERSEN HEADLINE: Daily Herald is devastated that Cross is not interested in Hastert's seat 

Cross not interested in Hastert’s seat  Oswego Republican likes state politics, family life near kids - 

SPRINGFIELD — With Congressman Dennis Hastert likely nearing an end to his political career, Tom Cross’ name tops nearly every list of potential Republican replacements.

But Cross, of Oswego, isn’t interested, telling the Daily Herald the family sacrifices he’d have to make are too severe and he enjoys leading the Republicans in the Illinois House.

“I have young kids. They’re 13 and 10. I get a chance to see their concerts, their basketball and soccer games, and baseball, and I love doing that. But two, I like state government. I like being the House Republican leader,” Cross said.

Cross has long been considered a protege of Hastert, the Plano Republican recently displaced as U.S. House speaker. Although there was immediate speculation he’d step down upon losing power, Hastert remains and has said he’ll serve out his term.

Still, both parties are scrambling for candidates for the day when the 14th Congressional District comes open.

And while he didn’t slam the door shut, Cross made it clear he’d prefer focusing on state government rather than seek a rank-and-file seat in the next Congress.

Cross recently sat down with the Daily Herald for a wide-ranging discussion. Here are excerpts from the interview. To hear more, go to dailyherald.com

On a Barack Obama  presidency:

Q: Given the potential benefits to Illinois, wouldn’t an Obama presidency be better than any other candidate?

A: I think Mayor Daley (a Democrat) thought it was good to have Speaker Hastert (a Republican) as the speaker because it meant more money coming into the state of Illinois for roads and mass transit and schools, and it was. And in that respect, it’s always good to have somebody in power in those positions.

So in that respect, sure it’s good to have somebody there, because that person’s going to hopefully help your state with money. But I don’t know that I’d go that far, that I’m going to have the same argument when it comes to policy. I’m going to support a Republican for policy reasons.

I understand the premise there. It’s good and there’s something to that, but it doesn’t mean I’m going to vote for him.

On his recent openness to gambling expansion:

Q: You’re the son of a Methodist minister, and in the past you’ve been critical of the state’s reliance on gambling. How do you balance that?

A: I don’t discount actually the Methodist church’s position on gaming. You do struggle with that. But it’s (gambling) here, I don’t think any Republicans voted for it, and at the end of the day, maybe the General Assembly doesn’t have the willingness to do that from a policy standpoint. My main point is there are only ... there aren’t a lot of places to go to get the money needed to do a (construction) bill.”

On Hastert’s post:

Q: You seem to be as interested in going to Washington as I am interested in going to Washington, which is not at all.

A: Yeah, I like state government. I think the speculation on Denny’s seat is a little premature, but I also understand the nature of the business we’re in and people love to speculate.

I have young kids. They’re 13 and 10. I get a chance to see their concerts, their basketball and soccer games, and baseball, and I love doing that. But two, I like state government. I like being the House Republican leader.

On political trust:

Q: When the Democratic leaders go behind closed doors, which one of them do you trust the most?

A: I get along with all the Democratic leaders. As far as I’m concerned, there’s not a trust issue that bothers me. We understand we’re in the minority. We understand that they’re going to do some things without us and that’s fine. I think we have a responsibility to voice our opposition when we have opposition, to work with them when we can, and it’s our duty and responsibility to tackle these problems, and we’ll do it when we have the opportunity, and even when we don’t, we’ll make our point known.

DIERSEN HEADLINE: VERY SAD: Tim Wise blames problems that minorities have on whites

http://www.dailyherald.com/news/kanestory.asp?id=278142&cc=k&tc=&t=

(DIERSEN: Yes, racism does exist, for example, in the Chicago Office of the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO).   Because I am a white male and I opposed their giving preference to minorities and females, my liberal Democrat GAO superiors wasted my career and forced me into early retirement.) 

Speaker reveals how deep race goes
Tim Wise wants to know if you thought about your racial identity today.

If not, you’re probably white, Wise says.

Wise, an anti-racism educator and author, lectures across the country on the dangers of white privilege.

Tuesday, he spoke to enthusiastic crowds at Elgin Community College as part of a lineup of events for Black History Month.

Contrary to the opinion of most white Americans, racism exists, Wise told students.

To deny racism is inherently racist because it discounts the experience and testimonials of people of color, Wise said.

And with racism, Wise said, comes its inverse: white privilege.

Wise sprinkles his lectures with humor — “white people are like Visa, they’re every … place you want to go” — and with statistics — a job applicant with a white-sounding name is 50 percent more likely to be called back than one with similar qualifications and a black-sounding name.

Wise challenged his audience Tuesday, and they responded with knowing nods, laughter and applause.

Wise has been labeled a racist by some and even drawn the occasional threat against his life.

But Wise, who is white, deflects the criticism, saying he’s not against whites but against white privilege.

Wise defines white privilege as the luxury of not having race affect your day-to-day life.

White people, Wise said, don’t have to worry about disproving negative stereotypes; or representing their race; or conforming to standards set by whites.

When Timothy McVeigh committed the Oklahoma City bombing, white people didn’t worry they would be labeled anti-government or extremists, Wise said.

When President Bush commits a grammatical blunder, whites don’t worry people will think they’re inarticulate.

And when whites want to learn about their own history, they don’t have to set aside a separate curriculum or month, because every day is white history day, Wise said.

The psychological advantage of being white, coupled with lingering social, economic and institutional inequalities, contributes to a lopsided state of affairs that is bad for minorities and whites alike, Wise said.

Wise sees the footprints of white privilege in many of America’s biggest missteps and tragedies — the Iraq war, Hurricane Katrina, Columbine.

For example, people of color by and large opposed the Iraq war, white people by and large supported it, Wise said.

Wise attributes the dichotomy to white privilege. Because white people were out of practice of seeing the world through other people’s eyes, they could not see that Americans would not be greeted as liberators, Wise said.

“White privilege says the world sees you the way you see you,” Wise said. “And there’s danger in living in that bubble.”

OUTSTANDING: Stop holding back Adoption and Scout license plates - State Sen. Kirk W. Dillard, Hinsdale 

http://www.dailyherald.com/opinion/fencepost.asp

I write about your story on a federal court ordering the Illinois Secretary of State to manufacture “Choose Life” license plates to promote and fund adoption.

The federal judge wrote, “where the government voluntarily provides a forum for private expression, the government may not discriminate against some speakers because of their viewpoint.”

Another license plate which the “politically correct” Democratic Party control in Springfield refuses to allow is for Boy or Girl Scouts.

It is time for the Democrats — under pressure from gay rights advocates to stop scouting — to lift the brick on license plates to promote scouting, as other states allow.

Illinois should be a place of common sense Midwestern values. Adoption and scouting are among those values.

LAKE COUNTY NEWS SUN

NOT SURPRISING: Beaubien and Link predict uneasy session over state finances - Jim Newton
http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/newssun/news/244500,5_1_WA06_CTYSTATELEG_S1.article

Gaming proposals, school and transportation issues and potential statewide smoking bans are all in the mix for the Legislature's spring session.

And the state's burgeoning deficit will not make resolution of controversial issues any easier.

"I predict the most difficult legislative year we've had in recent history," state Rep. Mark Beaubien, R-Barrington Hills, said at the Lake County Board's annual Legislative breakfast Friday in Gurnee.

"We have some serious budget and revenue issues that have not been addressed and will be addressed this year," Beaubien said, adding that he believes the session will extend beyond its scheduled conclusion in May.

State Sen. Terry Link, D-Waukegan, said the Senate leadership has met with Gov. Rod Blagojevich and that the governor has made it clear that neither income tax nor property tax increases will be a bail-out mechanism.

"We have to look at other revenues," Link said, adding that gaming proposals under consideration could generate between $2 billion and $4 billion a year. A casino for Waukegan is included in gambling proposals before the Legislature.

Link and Beaubien both vowed that the county's legislative delegation will fight hard to ensure that Lake County gets its fair share of transportation and school funding, and that county dollars will not go toward bailing out problems primarily related to Chicago and Cook County.

"There's no way we're going to pass a $3 million RTA bail-out," Beaubien said. "No way it's going to happen. That's just my opinion."

"We're a long way from what the RTA wants us to do," agreed Link. "We're not here to bail out the CTA and its mismanagement."

Link said a Senate Democratic Suburban Caucus, holding 11 of the Democrats 37 majority votes, has been formed to protect suburban funding issues including fair transportation and school funding for collar counties.

"We are going to be heard when it comes to these issues, Link said.

Link said he is sponsoring one of several smoke-free bills, and that his would ban smoking in restaurants, bars and casinos. He said Wisconsin legislators are also considering a statewide ban in conjunction with Illinois.

Beaubien and Link both were optimistic with regard to the County Board's legislation requests for the upcoming session.

The county is seeking funding for transportation improvements identified at a countywide traffic summit held in the fall.

Also on the board's wish list is more authority to negotiate developer impact fees and a larger role in the siting of cell towers in unincorporated areas.

"I think a lot of the things you're asking for could be accomplished this year," Beaubien said. "I think most of these things we can do this year."

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

DIERSEN HEADLINE: VERY SAD: Moderates demonize Platform Republicans calling them Extremists, again
(DIERSEN: The Republican Party exists to advance its platform which is conservative and the Democrat Party exists to advance its platform which is liberal.  Moderates reject some, many, or all the planks in the Republican platform.  Rather than demonizing Platform Republicans, rather than calling Platform Republicans Extremists, and rather than spending most if not all their time working against Platform Republicans, Moderates should form their own political party -- I suggest they call it the "Moderate Party" or the "Combine Party."  I am sure that people like Jim Edgar, Bob Kjellander, George Ryan, Jim Ryan, Jim Thompson, and Judy Baar Topinka their supporters would be more than happy to run it.)  

Politics in moderation  Former governors discuss bipartisan cooperation - Chris Klarer

Former President Bill Clinton once said, "When we put aside partisanship, embrace the best ideas regardless of where they come from and work for principled compromise, we can move America not left or right, but forward."

The SIUC Paul Simon Public Policy Institute explored this stance Tuesday night.

Three former governors, one a current U.S. Senator, came out to sing the praises of cooperation and centrism in a political climate they claim to be too often dominated by extremes.

"There is a reason that the first three words of the Constitution are 'we the people,'" former New Jersey Gov. and moderate Republican Christine Whitman said.

Guests at the event also included former Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar and former Nebraska Gov. and current U.S. Sen. Ben Nelson.

In their discussion, the speakers outlined a number of reasons why many politicians have continued to move towards the extreme of their parties, despite the large amount of citizens who express interest in bipartisan cooperation.

Whitman said it is up to the often-silent majority of moderates to stand up and demand that their legislative bodies reflect their image.

The majority of the public sees the country as more politically polarized than in the past and is ready for more compromise in government, according to a recent survey conducted by the Pew Research Center and National Public Radio.

The survey found that 75 percent of participants liked politicians that are willing to compromise, except on contentious issues like Iraq and abortion policy. The survey also found that 60 percent appreciate a mixture of conservative and liberal positions in their elected officials.

One contributor to polarization Whitman briefly touched on was the media. She said there are so many options available to the average American that news outlets often latch onto the more sensational issues and these tend to polarize the public.

She said that politicians also add to public polarization by calling attention to "litmus test" issues - contentious issues that tend to evoke strong emotions but do not affect people on a daily basis.

These issues can help them keep voters tied to their party based on single issues rather than overall scope, she said.

Edgar said allowing open primaries could increase voter turnout at primary election time, giving voters better choices from both parties. He said the extremes of both sides tend to be the ones that vote at primaries.

"People don't always want to publicly claim a party," he said.

Assistant Director of the Institute Matthew Baughman said it is important for students to see there are plenty of politicians who are not pandering to the interests of the extremists on the right or left side of the political spectrum.

"It's possible to be a moderate and be successful in politics, and to be effective in government," Baughman said. "That's perhaps something the nation needs more so now than ever."

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
Legislative leaders set campaign spending records
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/245778,campaign020607.article
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Open Republican seats in the Senate and vulnerable downstate Democrat seats in the House led to about a dozen strong races instead of the usual half-dozen or so seen in recent elections. In all, the leaders pumped nearly $20 million into all the legislative races. The Democrats -- Senate President Emil Jones and House Speaker Michael Madigan -- came out on top in money and wins. They spent nearly $11 million combined, while Senate Republican Leader Frank Watson and House Republican Leader Tom Cross spent about $9 million. Democrats also came out on top in the hottest contests, winning nine of the 11 most expensive races. That gives Democrats a 37-22 ''supermajority'' in the Senate and a 66-52 lead in the House. Campaign funds controlled by the leaders accounted for more than $8.4 million -- or 52 percent -- of the $16.1 million that went into the top 11 races. The Illinois Republican Party kicked in another $944,000, bringing the percentage to 58 percent.)
 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill.---- Candidates for the Illinois Legislature set new records in campaign spending last fall, thanks to the ever-growing influence of money and power from legislative leaders.

Eleven legislative races topped $1 million in spending, shattering the previous record of seven set just two years earlier, an analysis of campaign finance reports reveals.

More than half the money for those expensive contests came directly from the legislative leaders. In some races, the leaders contributed more than 80 percent of the candidates' money.

Advocates for campaign finance reform worry that the four leaders -- one from each party in the House and the Senate -- gain too much control over rank-and-file lawmakers by funding and running their campaigns. Lawmakers will pay more attention to the leaders than to voters, they argue.

''It's simply common sense that you're going to owe a deep allegiance to your leader,'' said Cindi Canary of the Illinois Campaign for Political Reform. ''That's who you're going to turn to every time you go out for election.''

Legislators in those top races deny that they're beholden to their leaders.

''My job is to listen to my constituents, and at the end of the day it's my constituents who sent me there,'' said Sen. Mike Frerichs, D-Urbana. ''You run great peril if you just concentrate on those who gave you money.''

The November election was unusual even for Illinois' free-spending legislative campaigns.

Open Republican seats in the Senate and vulnerable downstate Democrat seats in the House led to about a dozen strong races instead of the usual half-dozen or so seen in recent elections. In all, the leaders pumped nearly $20 million into all the legislative races.

The Democrats -- Senate President Emil Jones and House Speaker Michael Madigan -- came out on top in money and wins. They spent nearly $11 million combined, while Senate Republican Leader Frank Watson and House Republican Leader Tom Cross spent about $9 million.

Democrats also came out on top in the hottest contests, winning nine of the 11 most expensive races. That gives Democrats a 37-22 ''supermajority'' in the Senate and a 66-52 lead in the House.

Campaign funds controlled by the leaders accounted for more than $8.4 million -- or 52 percent -- of the $16.1 million that went into the top 11 races. The Illinois Republican Party kicked in another $944,000, bringing the percentage to 58 percent.

The most expensive race, at $2.1 million, was between Frerichs and Republican Judy Myers. That failed to break the old record of $2.4 million spent in a southern Illinois legislative contest in 2004, according to the Campaign for Political Reform.

The share of money from the leaders varied greatly among the races, from as little as 30 percent in a couple of races to more than 80 percent.

Legislative campaigns have been million dollar-plus affairs for more than a decade, but leaders have cranked up the money to make them professional, streamlined organizations run by their trusted staff members and key advisers.

The races have taken on more of a uniform look, Canary says. The ads and mailers used around Champaign may closely resemble the ones used by a different candidate in Elgin.

''It's becoming more focused,'' said Kent Redfield, a campaign finance expert and political science professor at the University of Illinois at Springfield. ''They're not local contests. They're leadership-dominated.''

Canary and Redfield worry that campaign domination translates into legislative domination.

Legislative leaders already strongly control the flow of legislation, and rank-and-file legislators might be wary of challenging their decisions if it means losing future campaign money.

The system also means interest groups can focus their lobbying and donations on just a handful of lawmakers, knowing that whatever the leaders decide will be supported by the rest.

Lawmakers say they still have a say in how their campaigns are run, and some argue they'd rather take money from the leaders than special interest groups who might expect favorable treatment in return.

''It's much better if he (Madigan) provides it,'' said Rep. Mike Boland, D-East Moline.

Boland agreed with reform advocates that reducing leadership's influence is a worthy goal, and that Illinois should look at options such as public financing of campaigns.

But the possibility seems remote as long as leaders who benefit from the system also are in charge of deciding whether it will change.

''Even though people don't like the system, they're comfortable and they're successful under the system,'' Redfield said.

VERY SAD: Abortion notification law on hold again - Abdon Pallasch 

http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/246391,CST-NWS-abort07.article

Illinois' courts are not ready to handle pregnant teens arriving to seek permission to get abortions, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.

So the state's parental notification law, which has been on ice for 12 years, stays that way.

But when the state's courts have worked out the procedures so girls arriving there are directed to the proper courtroom and the forms are all ready, Attorney General Lisa Madigan can return to court seeking to finally get the long-delayed 1995 law enacted, Judge David Coar ruled.

Madigan's attorneys said they would return, though they gave no timetable.

New bill introduced

The American Civil Liberties Union and abortion-rights activists praised Coar's ruling, though they recognize it may not last forever. "We applaud the judge for looking carefully at this and we are hopeful we will never see parental notice in Illinois," said ACLU attorney Lorie Chaiten. "We think the ruling is one that benefits the young women of Illinois."

State Rep. John Fritchey (D-Chicago) has introduced a bill that would broaden the list of adults a pregnant teen could have notified, including a clergy member.

DuPage County State's Attorney Joe Birkett said the law as it stands already allows for other adults to be notified and has been found constitutional in 38 states, including all of Illinois' surrounding states.

BEYOND OUTRAGEOUS: 4 convicted pols test state law, voter mercy - Stefano Esposito and Annie Sweeney

http://www.suntimes.com/news/elections/246500,CST-NWS-felons07.article

The Chicago City Council has churned out its share of felons over the years.

Now, four felons who once served as aldermen are hoping to churn out the vote this month to return to their old haunts.

Virgil Jones, Ambrosio Medrano and Percy Giles -- all convicted in the Operation Silver Shovel scandal -- are seeking to reclaim their seats in the 15th, 25th and 37th wards in the Feb. 27 election. Wallace Davis Jr., convicted in Operation Incubator while serving in the 27th Ward, is running for the 2nd Ward seat.

State law bars felons from holding municipal office. But the Chicago Board of Elections has ruled that it's unconstitutional to prevent the men from running, because felons can run for state and other elected offices. And the Illinois Supreme Court signaled this week that it will settle the matter sometime before Election Day.

For their part, prospective voters have divergent feelings about giving the four candidates second chances.

15th Ward

Of the 11 people running for alderman of the 15th Ward, two are known to have criminal pasts.

There's Jones, convicted in 1999 of taking bribes while in office.

And there's Tommie Grayer Sr.

Grayer, 82, said he assaulted a man 60 years ago -- but insists it was in self-defense.

He was in his early 20s and working as a short-order cook on the South Side when a customer yelled at him over an 85-cent egg order, Grayer said. The man threatened him with a gun, so Grayer threw a hammer at him, Grayer said, adding that he served six months probation for assault.

No public records could be found on the case, and Grayer said his record eventually was expunged.

Grayer sees a distinction between his crime and Jones'. "He doesn't deserve to be alderman for . . . the simple reason that he betrayed the trust of the people," Grayer said of Jones.

But some are looking past Jones' missteps.

"They haven't forgotten, but the ward has forgiven him," said John Morrison, who moved from the ward in 1997 but still clips hair at Penny's barbershop at 68th and Western, which he owns with his wife. "He was a real alderman. He walked the beat."

Jones continues to insist that he's innocent of all the charges and that the 41 months he spent in prison allowed him to plan his return.

"I've been involved silently working with people, talking with people . . . waiting for this opportunity," Jones said.

2nd Ward

In the booming South Loop, where the skyline is in an unrelenting upward thrust, it's hard to find people who know much about Wallace Davis Jr. After four years as a city alderman from 1983 to 1987, Davis was convicted of extortion and spent four years in prison.

Mia Karoutsos, who owns Downtown Pets on South Michigan, said she would never vote for someone with Davis' history. "He's already been convicted of lying and defying the people he was supposed to be taking care of," said Karoutsos, 30. "Why would we want to put him back in the same position to do it again?"

But on the West Side, not far from where Davis owns Wallace's Catfish Corner, some are more forgiving.

"He helps people out a lot," said Debra Johnson, 46 and unemployed. "He helped me one time to find a job."

Davis, 55, says he's committed no crime and his community embraces him.

"I have paid my debt to society -- a debt that was never owed," Davis said. "I wound up being lynched by the legal rope."

25th Ward

Arturo Cortes, 40, has lived in Pilsen since 1979. He owns a wedding photography business. He takes for granted that all politicians are in it for the money.

It doesn't trouble Cortes that candidate Ambrosio Medrano pleaded guilty in 1996 to accepting $31,000 in bribes. "This time he's not going to fail," Cortes said.

Cortes plans to vote for Medrano because he says the candidate is responsive to people's needs.

But along South Halsted, lined with art galleries and many newcomers, some are more cautious.

"We don't need someone who doesn't have a moral bone in his body," said Robin Rios, owner of 4 Art gallery.

Medrano says he's paid for his mistake. "I don't know how many times I have to pay," he said. "I don't know what I have to do. If anything, what I did made me a better individual."

37th Ward

Aldermanic candidate Daryl Jones doesn't use the term "political suicide," but he says publicly bashing another candidate for his felony history is unwise in a ward where many residents have been locked up at one time or another.

"The general feeling around the ward is that if you commit a crime, if you [do] your time, then you should be permitted to run," said Jones, a Cook County prosecutor.

In fact, voters already have given candidate Percy Giles a second chance: They re-elected him as 37th Ward alderman in 1999, even though he'd just been indicted for racketeering, bribery, extortion and mail fraud. He was forced to step down after a jury convicted him later that year.

Some in the ward wonder why it's OK for him to run for office while a felony history often keeps residents from getting decent jobs.

Says Giles: "I'm asking for a second chance to be a servant to my community."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Race, religion sensitive subtext in presidential campaign  South Side church's tenets spark criticism of Obama by some conservatives - Manya A. Brachear and Bob Secter
The expected launch of Barack Obama's presidential campaign is still days away, but his quest to become the nation's first black commander in chief already is forcing a delicate examination of how candidates talk about race.

That conversation took an awkward turn last week when Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) ruined his presidential campaign announcement with clumsy comments meant to praise Obama though widely interpreted as a putdown of other prominent black politicians.

But Obama also faces his own challenges in dealing with race as he seeks to frame himself as a candidate who can bridge historic divisions not only of race, but class and religion as well.

Even the simple act of choosing a church can become fodder in a national political campaign, where every facet of a candidate's life and associations will be put under a microscope. A year before the first primary contests, Obama is taking fire from both the left and the right in these matters.

The product of a black Kenyan father, white American mother and a series of elite schools, Obama has prompted some African-Americans to question whether he is really in touch with their lives.

In conservative circles

At the same time, conservative critics already have begun a buzz on the Internet about a far less known part of his biography: his adherence to the creed of the prominent South Side church he attends, Trinity United Church of Christ. The congregation posits what it terms a Black Value System, including calls to be "soldiers for black freedom" and a "disavowal of the pursuit of middleclassness."

In an interview late Monday, Obama said it was important to understand the document as a whole rather than highlight individual tenets. "Commitment to God, black community, commitment to the black family, the black work ethic, self-discipline and self-respect," he said. "Those are values that the conservative movement in particular has suggested are necessary for black advancement.

"So I would be puzzled that they would object or quibble with the bulk of a document that basically espouses profoundly conservative values of self-reliance and self-help."

In his published memoirs, Obama said even he was stopped by Trinity's tenet to disavow "middleclassness" when he first read it two decades ago in a church pamphlet. The brochure implored upwardly mobile church members not to distance themselves from less fortunate Trinity worshipers.

"As I read it, at least, it was a very simple argument taken directly from Scripture: `To whom much is given much is required,'" Obama said in the interview.

That was then. On Saturday, Obama is expected to thrust himself into the hothouse atmosphere of presidential campaign politics, where the principles and teachings of Obama's church might require some explanation for, say, some white, middle-class voters in Iowa or New Hampshire.

As a candidate who has presented himself as able to enliven a national discourse on faith--he filled his now-famous Democratic convention speech in 2004 with religious language--Obama would not be the first presidential candidate to invite an examination of the political implications of his religious beliefs.

Like President John Kennedy, a Roman Catholic, 2000 vice presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew, or current GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney, a Mormon, Obama at some point in a presidential campaign would be asked to explain how he would balance the tenets of his faith with his political positions.

The intended meaning behind certain Trinity precepts is complex, but some theologians argue that on one level they brush up against a number of the same issues raised by Biden's awkward choice of words.

"In both cases--in the value system and in the case of Biden's comments--we do have a situation where Americans are trying to talk across the wide chasm that is race," said Melissa Harris-Lacewell, a professor of politics and African-American studies at Princeton University.

Harris-Lacewell until last year attended Trinity when she taught at the University of Chicago. "Perceptually, blacks and whites live in vastly different worlds," she added. "Biden didn't mean it to be racist. Certainly Obama doesn't mean that God doesn't love white people. . . . Malicious [intent] or not does not necessarily matter if the ideas are prepackaged with all of this historical baggage."

Looking to weigh Obama down with some of that baggage, conservative critics have seized on Trinity's 12-point Black Value System, especially the portion relating to "middleclassness," as evidence that Obama is a divisive candidate who rejects mainstream American values and is primarily focused on the black community.

"I question his . . . ability to be able to reach out to a lot of people when he is committed to a group of people who are focused on helping a certain group of people," said Fran Eaton, editor of Illinois Review, a conservative political blog. "It seems wrong."

But Obama scoffed at the suggestion that Trinity espouses a value system that seeks to help blacks exclusively. "If I say to anybody in Iowa--white, black, Hispanic or Asian--that my church believes in the African-American community strengthening families or adhering to the black work ethic or being committed to self-discipline and self-respect and not forgetting where you came from, I don't think that's something anybody would object to.

"I think I'd get a few amens."

Trinity, which adopted the principles in 1981, highlights them in brief form on its Web site without elaboration. That leaves room for critics to fill the vacuum.

Difficult task awaits

Political scientist Steffen Schmidt, an Iowa State University expert on the party caucuses in his state, said anything perceived as a rejection of the middle class will not sit well with voters. Fair or not, Obama must move quickly to explain the value system and what it means to him or risk having the issue defined by critics, he said.

Otherwise, Schmidt added: "There go the soccer moms and there go the NASCAR dads."

Explaining those religious ideas could prove a difficult task in today's political world where complex concepts must be reduced to pithy sound bites and attempts at nuance are often considered evidence of being wishy-washy.

Trinity's value system springs from an era when black Christians in Chicago were abandoning congregations they felt were too closely aligned with the administration of Mayor Richard J. Daley. A similar exodus was occurring around the country, with African-Americans turning away from black pastors they felt were too tepid in their response to the civil rights movement.

To curb black flight from the pews, Trinity's pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr., embraced a theology of black liberation that held black Christians accountable for taking care of their own and for continuing to fight oppression, sharing in the struggle even if it didn't touch them. To this day, Trinity's congregation of 8,500 spans the spectrum from public housing residents to powerbrokers including Obama and other celebrities.

Vallmer Jordan, a church member who helped draft the precepts, said they were designed to empower the black community and counter a value system imposed by whites. "The big question mark was racism," he said. "Black disempowerment was an integral part of that historical value system. It became increasingly apparent to me that we black people had not developed our own value system . . . to help us overcome all we knew we had to battle."

He acknowledged that the principle on "middleclassness" was a hard sell, even then.

"There was a hunk of resistance to that principle," Jordan said. But eventually committee members came to understand its intention: "Any black person who identifies himself as middle-class psychologically withdraws from the group and becomes a proponent of strengthening and sustaining the system," he said.

Harris-Lacewell, the Princeton professor, said the "disavowal of the pursuit of middleclassness" is simply an argument against materialism and the pursuit of the American standard of wealth. Many white Christian churches also preach against materialism.

`That's going to resonate'

"If [Obama] can figure out a way to get the sound bite for that," she said, "I actually think that's going to resonate with a lot of people beyond African-Americans."

In his early forays to address the issue of how faith affects his public life, Obama has had a fair degree of success. "If we truly hope to speak to people where they're at--to communicate our hopes and values in a way that's relevant to their own--then as progressives, we cannot abandon the field of religious discourse," he said in a widely praised speech last summer to progressive evangelical Christians.

Later, Obama and conservative Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kansas), another potential presidential contender, received a warm welcome at Saddleback Church, the evangelical megachurch in California.

In addition to attempting to bridge religious divides, Obama now finds himself needing to bridge racial divides--even among blacks. Given his racial heritage and upbringing in a white household, Obama has prompted skepticism among African-Americans who have questioned whether he has enough in common with them to reflect their interests.

Writing in the online magazine Salon, essayist Debra Dickerson summarized this point of view while crediting Obama with potentially opening doors for other non-white presidential candidates. "Barack Obama would be the great black hope in the next presidential race--if he were actually black," she wrote, later adding that he should be considered "an American of African immigrant extraction" and not a descendent of American slaves.

Biden's gaffe

Obama received some unintended support in this regard from Biden just last week. In a newspaper interview, Biden sought to praise him as a worthy opponent. "You got the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy" he said in remarks seen by many people as condescending.

The gaffe gave Obama the opportunity to appear magnanimous in the face of an insult. Initially, Obama graciously said Biden "didn't intend to offend" anyone. But shortly after, he issued a statement that highlighted his connection to African-American political leaders who preceded him.

Calling Biden's comment "historically inaccurate," Obama praised Jesse Jackson Sr., Shirley Chisholm, Carol Moseley Braun and Al Sharpton as past presidential candidates who "gave a voice to many important issues through their campaigns, and no one would call them inarticulate."

Excerpts from the Black Value System

COMMITMENT TO GOD

" `The God of our weary years' will give us the strength to give up prayerful passivism and become Black Christian Activists, soldiers for Black freedom and the dignity of all humankind."

What experts say

Such a commitment stems from the time of slavery when God not only sustained the African-American community but also empowered the abolitionists and later fueled the civil rights movement.

ADHERENCE TO

BLACK WORK ETHIC

"High productivity must be a goal of the Black workforce."

What experts say

In many ways, the Black Value System is intended to be an internal critique of the African-American community. Black people toiled during and after slavery so their children could have a better life. The value system asserts that subsequent generations owe it to their ancestors to do the same.

DISAVOWAL OF THE PURSUIT OF "MIDDLECLASSNESS"

"While it is permissible to chase `middle-incomeness' with all our might, we must avoid . . . the psychological entrapment of Black `middleclassness.' "

What experts say

Authors of the value system discourage black men and women from defining themselves by socioeconomic class. Instead, they should share in the collective struggle of the African-American community and work toward its empowerment.

Source: Trinity United Church of Christ, Tribune reporting
 
NOT SURPRISING: Governor attacks cuts to health care  Blagojevich sees threat to expanded services - Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich attacked the budget proposal from President Bush on Monday, saying it would hamper the state's efforts to expand health and human services programs for working- and middle-class families, including the All Kids program designed to provide health care to all children regardless of family income.

Overall, the president's budget would reduce spending for Medicare and Medicaid by $96 billion over the next five years, according to the White House budget office. While state officials do not know exactly how much would come out of Illinois' share, they say the size of the cuts surely means that they would affect All Kids and other special health insurance programs.

"The president's plan reduces flexibility and cuts federal support in the very areas that have enabled states to launch innovative programs like All Kids," Blagojevich said. "He would shift an even greater share of costs and risks to businesses, working families, states and health-care providers, and do so without significantly addressing the plight of the uninsured from the federal level."

Bush administration officials said the proposed federal budget funds the right priorities at a level the government can sustain over the long run, and some Republican members of the Illinois congressional delegation were immediately supportive of the spending plan. An aide to former Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) said Illinois had fared well under the Bush administration in terms of health care.

But Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) criticized the priorities in Bush's 2008 spending plan, which he said is "not the budget the American people voted for."

According to Durbin's analysis, Illinois would lose $16 million in 2008 funding for the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which covers children with family incomes exceeding twice the poverty level. Coupled with the sweeping cuts to Medicaid, those reductions stand to affect the state's universal health care plan for children, according to Anne Marie Murphy, director of health care programs for Blagojevich.

The budget proposal would curtail the state's ability to expand health-care coverage beyond 200 percent of poverty, which is $40,000 for a family of four, Murphy said. After taxes, she said, such a family usually has a hard time coming up with the average $12,000 family health-care premium.

"It defies the reality that working families need assistance," Murphy said.

But Mike Stokke, an aide to Hastert, disagreed with the governor's stance on the budget.

"We've passed drug benefits that actually picked up a huge cost from the states" in the recent past, Stokke said. "You actually saw Medicaid surpluses at the state level for the first time. I understand where [the governor is] coming from, but our state has done pretty well by this president in terms of health care."
 
ILLINOIS REVIEW
Debbie does... ?? - Jill Stanek
Responding to a barrage of criticism for signing on executive order that will force adolescent girls to receive the HPV vaccine regimen, Texas Gov. Rick Perry is quoted in the Houston Chronicle today saying, "If the medical community developed a vaccine for lung cancer, would the same critics oppose it claiming it would encourage smoking?"

I have thought of that analogy myself.  It is perfect.  Lung cancer is predominantly caused by cigarette smoking, which is currently a politically incorrect behaviorChicago and Illinois lawmakers have increasingly sought to discourage this behavior by making it more difficult to carry out this behavior.

So to answer Perry's question, we would welcome a lung cancer vaccine but wouldn't turn around and say, "Great, let's all smoke!"  Because we know smoking causes a myriad of other cancers as well as health problems like emphysema and hardening of the arteries.  Furthermore, we know this behavior has secondary consequences of endangering the health of other people who come in contact with the smoker.

So when state Sen. Debbie Halvorson admitted she had HPV and worried others might get it, you would think she'd focus on her behavior that caused her to contract that sexually transmitted disease.

Halvorson would be most helpful by discussing the health consequences of pre- or extra-marital sex.  Here are some potential topics:

  • Halvorson could discuss the number of sex partners she has had throughout her lifetime and how each one increased the likelihood of contracting HPV. 
  • If Halvorson even had only one sex partner aside from her husband, she could discuss how one can contract HPV from a sole encounter. 
  • Halvorson could discuss whether she realized at the time her sex partner carried HPV, which most trusting, vulnerable women don't. 
  • Halvorson could disclose whether it was her husband who passed HPV on to her after sleeping with other women, demonstrating another reason for chaste behavior outside the marriage bedroom. 
  • More uncomfortably, if Halvorson contracted HPV through rape, she could discuss ways to avoid rape.

But no, Halvorson does not advocate avoiding a risky behavior that leads not only to HPV but to 20+ other STDs and their strains, along with unplanned pregnancy.  Halvorson merely advocates trying to avoid the consequences of risky behavior.  Shame on her.

AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION OF ILLINOIS
VERY SAD: Federal Judge Blocks Effort to Revive Dormant Parental Notification Law 
CHICAGO, Feb. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- U.S. District Court Judge David Coar today rebuffed an effort by the Illinois Attorney General's office to lift a 1996 injunction barring enforcement of the Illinois Parental Notice Act. The Attorney General's office argued in a January 19th filing that the Illinois Supreme Court had adopted rules to implement judicial bypass of the parental notice requirement and that, therefore, it was appropriate for the federal court to dissolve the decade-old injunction. Judge Coar denied this request on the grounds that Illinois state courts are not positioned to implement a bypass process, making the Attorney General's request inappropriate.
 
"Judge Coar recognized that courts in Illinois are not prepared with an expeditious and confidential process for a judicial bypass of the mandatory parental notice," said Lorie A. Chaiten, Director of the Reproductive Rights Project of the ACLU of Illinois. "Without this confidential and expeditious process, the health and well-being of young women in the State of Illinois could not be protected."
 
"We heard Judge Coar indicate today that he is not prepared to rule on allowing enforcement of the mandatory parental notice law until the courts across our state can ensure the process will protect the constitutional rights of young women as well as their health and safety," added Chaiten.
 
This concern is supported by medical experts and research in this area. The American Academy of Pediatrics opposes mandatory parental notification laws, because such laws are dangerous to the health and lives of young women. The AAP is joined in its opposition by every major medical organization, including the American Medical Association, the Society for Adolescent Medicine, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Public Health Association.
 
Documented evidence shows that the vast majority of young women facing unwanted pregnancies consult with a parent, older sibling, religious advisor or a close family friend for decision-making guidance. When a young woman does not consult her parents, it is for good reason-often fears of physical and emotional abuse, harm to other family members and the prospect of being made homeless.
 
"We are delighted with the court's ruling and committed to our advocacy to protect the health and well-being of young women in our state," said Chaiten.
 
Source: American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois

CONTACT: Edwin C. Yohnka of the American Civil Liberties Union of
Illinois, +1-312-201-9740, ext. 305, Pager: +1-312-851-2832,
Cell: +1-847-687-1129, eyohnka@aclu-il.org

NAPERVILLE SUN

DuPage Housing Authority stands to lose over $1 million in vouchers - Paige Winfield

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/napervillesun/news/246121,6_1_NA07_BIGGERT_S1.article

(DIERSEN QUESTION: What percentage of housing voucher recipients blame their problems on Republicans and always vote for Democrats?)

It may become more difficult for low-wage earners in DuPage to obtain federally subsidized housing vouchers if the U.S. Senate passes a revised funding formula under the Fiscal Year 2007 Continuing Resolution.

Under the new formula, the DuPage County Housing Authority will lose about 100 housing vouchers worth more than $1 million, while the Chicago Housing Authority will see its funds boosted nearly $51 million. The bill has passed the House and now awaits Senate approval.

Rep. Judy Biggert, R-Hinsdale, is urging Democratic Sens. Barack Obama and Dick Durbin to work with Republicans to reform the Section 8 housing funding.

"While Chicago does quite well under this revised formula, it does so at the expense of suburban seniors and low-income families who rely on Section 8 vouchers to keep a roof over their head," Biggert said in a letter to the senators.

"Our constituents are not well served by this abrupt and drastic change in the formula," she said.

Under its current contract, the DuPage Housing Authority has $23 million to grant 2,571 vouchers to county residents who earn at or below 50 percent of the median income. A voucher recipient typically receives $8,800-$9,000 per year to use for apartment rent, depending on his or her income level.

A 3 percent to 4 percent county poverty rate and more than 1,000 names on the waiting list for vouchers contradicts those who deny the presence of poverty in DuPage, said John Day, president of the Housing Authority.

He added that the new Section 8 formula is disproportionately weighted to favor the city of Chicago.

Other Chicago suburbs also will suffer from the bill. Cook County Housing Authority will lose $8 million, while the Joliet and Aurora Housing Authorities each stand to lose around $1 million.

 
 
Reply | Send to a Friend
 
March 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Mar-2007
March 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Mar-2007
March 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Mar-2007
March 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Mar-2007
March 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Mar-2007
March 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Mar-2007
March 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips - Text Only - 1 8-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips - Text Only - 2 8-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Mar-2007
March 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Mar-2007
March 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Mar-2007
March 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Mar-2007
March 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Mar-2007
March 3, 2007 News Clps 3-Mar-2007
March 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Mar-2007
March 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Mar-2007
February 28, 2007 News Clips 28-Feb-2007
February 27, 2007 News Clips 27-Feb-2007
February 26, 2007 News Clips 26-Feb-2007
February 25, 2007 News Clips 25-Feb-2007
February 24, 2007 News Clips 24-Feb-2007
February 23, 2007 News Clips 23-Feb-2007
February 22, 2007 News Clips 22-Feb-2007
February 21, 2007 News Clips 21-Feb-2007
February 20, 2007 News Clips 20-Feb-2007
February 19, 2007 News Clips 19-Feb-2007
February 18, 2007 News Clips 18-Feb-2007
February 17, 2007 News Clips 17-Feb-2007
February 16, 2007 News Clips 16-Feb-2007
February 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Feb-2007
February 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Feb-2007
February 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Feb-2007
February 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Feb-2007
February 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Feb-2007
February 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Feb-2007
February 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Feb-2007
February 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Feb-2007
February 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Feb-2007
February 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Feb-2007
February 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Feb-2007
February 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Feb-2007
Februray 3, 2007 News Clips 3-Feb-2007
February 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Feb-2007
February 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Feb-2007
January 31, 2007 News Clips 31-Jan-2007
January 30, 2007 News Clips 30-Jan-2007
January 29, 2007 News Clips 29-Jan-2007
January 28, 2007 News Clips 28-Jan-2007
January 27, 2007 News Clips 27-Jan-2007
January 26, 2007 News Clips 26-Jan-2007
January 25, 2007 News Clips 25-Jan-2007
January 24, 2007 News Clips 24-Jan-2007
January 23, 2007 News Clips 23-Jan-2007
January 22, 2007 News Clips 22-Jan-2007
January 21, 2007 News Clips 21-Jan-2007
January 20, 2007 News Clips 20-Jan-2007
January 19, 2007 News Clips 19-Jan-2007
January 18, 2007 News Clips 18-Jan-2007
January 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Jan-2007
January 16, 2007 News Clips 16-Jan-2007
January 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Jan-2007
January 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Jan-2007
January 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Jan-2007
January 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Jan-2007
January 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Jan-2007
January 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Jan-2007
January 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Jan-2007
January 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Jan-2007
January 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Jan-2007
January 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips - Text 1 5-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips - Text 2 5-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Jan-2007
January 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Jan-2007
January 3, 2007 News Clips 3-Jan-2007
January 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Jan-2007
January 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Jan-2007
December 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Dec-2006
December 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Dec-2006
December 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Dec-2006
December 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Dec-2006
December 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Dec-2006
December 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Dec-2006
December 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Dec-2006
December 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Dec-2006
December 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Dec-2006
December 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Dec-2006
December 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Dec-2006
December 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Dec-2006
December 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Dec-2006
December 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Dec-2006
December 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Dec-2006
December 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Dec-2006
December 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Dec-2006
December 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Dec-2006
December 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Dec-2006
December 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Dec-2006
December 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Dec-2006
December 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Dec-2006
December 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Dec-2006
December 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Dec-2006
December 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Dec-2006
December 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Dec-2006
December 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Dec-2006
December 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Dec-2006
December 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Dec-2006
December 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Dec-2006
December 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Dec-2006
November 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Nov-2006
November 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Nov-2006
November 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Nov-2006
November 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Nov-2006
November 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Nov-2006
November 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Nov-2006
November 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Nov-2006
November 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Nov-2006
November 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Nov-2006
November 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Nov-2006
November 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Nov-2006
November 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Nov-2006
November 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Nov-2006
November 17, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Nov-2006
November 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Nov-2006
November 16, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Nov-2006
November 16, 2006 News Clips 17-Nov-2006
November 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Nov-2006
November 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Nov-2006
November 14, 2006 News Clips - Text 14-Nov-2006
November 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Nov-2006
November 13, 2006 News Clips - Text 13-Nov-2006
November 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Nov-2006
November 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 12-Nov-2006
November 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Nov-2006
November 11, 2006 News Clips - Text 11-Nov-2006
November 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Nov-2006
November 10, 2006 News Clips - Text 10-Nov-2006
November 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 9-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 9-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 8-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 8-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Nov-2006
November 7, 2006 News Clips - Text 7-Nov-2006
November 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Nov-2006
November 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 6-Nov-2006
November 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Nov-2006
November 5, 2006 News Clips - Text 5-Nov-2006
November 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Nov-2006
November 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 4-Nov-2006
November 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 3-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 3-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 2-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 2-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Nov-2006
November 1, 2006 News Clips - Text 1-Nov-2006
November 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Nov-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 31-Oct-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 31-Oct-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Oct-2006
October 30, 2006 News Clips - Text 30-Oct-2006
October 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 29-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 29-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Oct-2006
October 28, 2006 News Clips - Text 28-Oct-2006
October 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 27-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 27-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clip - Text 1 26-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 26-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Oct-2006
October 25, @006 News Clips - Text 25-Oct-2006
October 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips -Text 1 24-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 24-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Oct-2006
October 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 23-Oct-2006
October 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 22-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 22-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Oct-2006
October 21, 2006 News Clips - Text 21-Oct-2006
October 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Oct-2006
October 20, 2006 News Clips - Text 20-Oct-2006
October 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Oct-2006
October 19, 2006 News Clips - Text 19-Oct-2006
October 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 18-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 18-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Oct-2006
October 17, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Oct-2006
October 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Oct-2006
October 16, 2006 News Clips - Text 16-Oct-2006
October 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Oct-2006
October 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Oct-2006
October 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Oct-2006
October 14, 2006 News Clips - Text 14-Oct-2006
October 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Oct-2006
October 13, 2006 News Clips - Text (1 of 2) 13-Oct-2006
October 13, 2006 News Clips (1 of 2) 13-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 12-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 12-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Oct-2006
October 11, 2006 News Clips - Text 11-Oct-2006
October 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Oct-2006
October 10, 2006 News Clips - Text 10-Oct-2006
October 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Oct-2006
October 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 8-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 8-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Oct-2006
October 7, 2006 News Clips - Text 7-Oct-2006
October 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 6-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 6-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 1 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 2 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 3 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips Text 1 4-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 4-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clip - Text -1 3-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 3-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Oct-2006
October 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Oct-2006
October 1, 2006 News Clips - Text 1-Oct-2006
October 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Oct-2006
September 30, 2006 News Clips - Text 30-Sep-2006
September 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Sep-2006
September 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 29-Sep-2006
September 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Sep-2006
September 28, 2006 News Clips - Text 28-Sep-2006
September 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Sep-2006
September 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Sep-2006
September 26, 2006 News Clips - Text 26-Sep-2006
September 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Sep-2006
September 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Sep-2006
September 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Sep-2006
September 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Sep-2006
September 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 22-Sep-2006
September 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Sep-2006
September 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Sep-2006
September 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Sep-2006
September 19, 2006 News Clips - Text 19-Sep-2006
September 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Sep-2006
September 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Sep-2006
September 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Sep-2006
September 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Sep-2006
September 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Sep-2006
September 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Sep-2006
September 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Sep-2006
September 13, 2006 News Clips - text 13-Sep-2006
September 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Sep-2006
September 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Sep-2006
September 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Sep-2006
September 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Sep-2006
September 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Sep-2006
September 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-Sep-2006
September 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Sep-2006
September 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Sep-2006
September 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Sep-2006
September 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Sep-2006
September 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Sep-2006
September 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Sep-2006
September 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Sep-2006
September 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Sep-2006
August 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Aug-2006
August 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Aug-2006
August 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Aug-2006
August 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Aug-2006
August 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Aug-2006
August 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Aug-2006
August 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Aug-2006
August 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Aug-2006
August 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Aug-2006
August 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Aug-2006
August 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Aug-2006
August 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Aug-2006
August 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Aug-2006
August 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Aug-2006
August 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Aug-2006
August 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Aug-2006
August 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Aug-2006
August 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Aug-2006
August 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Aug-2006
August 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Aug-2006
August 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Aug-2006
August 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Aug-2006
August 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Aug-2006
August 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Aug-2006
August 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Aug-2006
August 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Aug-2006
August 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Aug-2006
August 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Aug-2006
August 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Aug-2006
August 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Aug-2006
August 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Aug-2006
July 31, 2006 News Clips 31-July-2006
July 30, 2006 News Clips 30-July-2006
July 29, 2006 News Clips 29-July-2006
July 28, 2006 News Clips 28-July-2006
July 27, 2006 News Clips 27-July-2006
July 26, 2006 News Clips 26-July-2006
July 25, 2006 News Clips 25-July-2006
July 24, 2006 News Clips 24-July-2006
July 23, 2006 News Clips 23-July-2006
July 22, 2006 News Clips 22-July-2006
July 21, 2006 News Clips 21-July-2006
July 20, 2006 News Clips 20-July-2006
July 19, 2006 News Clips 19-July-2006
July 18, 2006 News Clips 18-July-2006
July 17, 2006 News Clips 17-July-2006
July 16, 2006 News Clips 16-July-2006
July 15, 2006 News Clips 15-July-2006
July 14, 2006 News Clip - Text 14-July-2006
July 14, 2006 News Clips 14-July-2006
July 13, 2006 News Clips 13-July-2006
July 12, 2006 News Clips 12-July-2006
July 11, 2006 News Clips 11-July-2006
July 10, 2006 News Clips 10-July-2006
July 9, 2006 News Clips 9-July-2006
July 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-July-2006
July 8, 2006 News Clips 8-July-2006
July 7, 2006 News Clips 7-July-2006
July 6, 2006 News Clips 6-July-2006
July 5, 2006 News Clips 5-July-2006
July 4, 2006 News Clips 4-July-2006
July 3, 2006 News Clips 3-July-2006
July 2, 2006 News Clips 2-July-2006
July 1, 2006 News Clips 1-July-2006
June 30, 2006 News Clips 30-June-2006
June 29, 2006 News Clips 29-June-2006
June 28, 2006 News Clips 28-June-2006
June 27, 2006 News Clips 27-June-2006
June 26, 2006 News Clips 26-June-2006
June 25, 2006 News Clips 25-June-2006
June 24, 2006 News Clips 24-June-2006
June 23, 2006 News Clips 23-June-2006
June 22, 2006 News Clips 22-June-2006
June 21, 2006 News Clips 21-June-2006
June 20, 2006 News Clips 20-June-2006
June 19, 2006 News Clips 19-June-2006
June 18, 2006 News Clips 18-June-2006
June 17, 2006 News Clips 17-June-2006
June 16, 2006 News Clips 16-June-2006
June 15, 2006 News Clips 15-June-2006
June 14, 2006 News Clips 14-June-2006
June 13, 2006 News Clips 13-June-2006
June 12, 2006 News Clips 12-June-2006
June 11, 2006 News Clips 11-June-2006
June 10, 2006 News Clips 10-June-2006
June 9, 2006 News Clips 9-June-2006
June 8, 2006 News Clips 8-June-2006
June 7, 2006 News Clips 7-June-2006
June 6, 2006 News Clips 6-June-2006
June 5, 2006 News Clips 5-June-2006
June 4, 2006 News Clips 4-June-2006
June 3, 2006 News Clips 3-June-2006
June 2, 2006 News Clips 2-June-2006
June 1, 2006 News Clips 1-June-2006
May 31, 2006 News Clips 31-May-2006
May 30, 2006 News Clips 30-May-2006
May 29, 2006 News Clips 29-May-2006
May 28, 2006 News Clips 28-May-2006
May 27, 2006 News Clips 27-May-2006
May 26, 2006 News Clips 26-May-2006
May 25, 2006 News Clips 25-May-2006
May 24, 2006 News Clips 24-May-2006
May 23, 2006 News Clips 23-May-2006
May 22, 2006 News Clips 22-May-2006
May 21, 2006 News Clips 21-May-2006
May 20, 2006 News Clips 20-May-2006
May 19, 2006 News Clips 19-May-2006
May 18, 2006 News Clips 18-May-2006
May 17, 2006 News Clips 17-May-2006
May 16, 2006 News Clips 16-May-2006
May 15, 2006 News Clips 15-May-2006
May 14, 2006 News Clips 14-May-2006
May 13, 2006 News Clips 13-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips Text 1 12-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips Text 2 12-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips 12-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 1 11-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 2 11-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 11-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 1 10-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 2 10-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 10-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips -Text 1 9-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 9-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips 9-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips 8-May-2006
May 7, 2006 News Clips 7-May-2006
May 6, 2006 News Clips 6-May-2006
May 5, 2006 News Clips 5-May-2006
May 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 4-May-2006
May 4, 2006 News Clips 4-May-2006
May 3, 2006 News Clips 3-May-2006
May 2, 2006 News Clips 2-May-2006
May 1, 2006 News Clips 1-May-2006
April 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Apr-2006
April 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Apr-2006
April 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Apr-2006
April 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Apr-2006
April 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips Text 1 25-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips Text 2 25-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Apr-2006
April 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Apr-2006
April 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Apr-2006
April 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Apr-2006
April 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Apr-2006
April 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Apr-2006
April 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Apr-2006
April 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Apr-2006
April 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Apr-2006
April 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Apr-2006
April 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Apr-2006
April 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Apr-2006
April 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Apr-2006
April 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 12-Apr-2006
April 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Apr-2006
April 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Apr-2006
April 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Apr-2006
April 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Apr-2006
April 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Apr-2006
April 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Apr-2006
April 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Apr-2006
April 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Apr-2006
April 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Apr-2006
April 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Apr-2006
April 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Apr-2006
April 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Apr-2006
March 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Mar-2006
March 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Mar-2006
March 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Mar-2006
March 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Mar-2006
March 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Mar-2006
March 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Mar-2006
March 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Mar-2006
March 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 23-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 23-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Mar-2006
March 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Mar-2006
March 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Mar-2006
March 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Mar-2006
March 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Mar-2006
March 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Mar-2006
March 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Mar-2006
March 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Mar-2006
March 15, 2006 news Clips 15-Mar-2006
March 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Mar-2006
March 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips - 2 12-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips -1 12-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Mar-2006
March 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Mar-2006
March 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Mar-2006
March 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Mar-2006
March 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Mar-2006
March 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 6-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 6-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Mar-2006
March 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Mar-2006
March 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Mar-2006
March 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Mar-2006
March 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Mar-2006
March 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Mar-2006
February 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Feb-2006
February 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Feb-2006
February 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Feb-2006
February 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Feb-2006
February 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Feb-2006
February 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Feb-2006
February 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Feb-2006
February 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Feb-2006
February 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Feb-2006
February 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Feb-2006
February 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Feb-2006
February 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Feb-2006
February 16, 2006 News clips 16-Feb-2006
February 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Feb-2006
February 14, 2006 News Clips (TEXT) 14-Feb-2006
February 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Feb-2006
February 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Feb-2006
February 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Feb-2006
February 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Feb-2006
February 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Feb-2006
February 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Feb-2006
February 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Feb-2006
February 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Feb-2006
February 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Feb-2006
February 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Feb-2006
February 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Feb-2006
February 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Feb-2006
February 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Feb-2006
February 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Feb-2006
January 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Jan-2006
January 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Jan-2006
January 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Jan-2006
January 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Jan-2006
January 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Jan-2006
January 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Jan-2006
January 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Jan-2006
January 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Jan-2006
January 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Jan-2006
January 22, 2006 news Clips 22-Jan-2006
January 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Jan-2006
January 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Jan-2006
January 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Jan-2006
January 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Jan-2006
January 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Jan-2006
January 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Jan-2006
January 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Jan-2006
January 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Jan-2006
January 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Jan-2006
January 12, 2006 News clips 12-Jan-2006
January 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Jan-2006
January 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Jan-2006
January 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Jan-2006
January 8, 2006 News Chips 8-Jan-2006
January 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Jan-2006
January 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Jan-2006
January 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Jan-2006
January 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Jan-2006
January 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Jan-2006
January 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Jan-2006
January 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Jan-2006
December 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Dec-2005
December 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Dec-2005
December 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Dec-2005
December 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Dec-2005
December 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Dec-2005
December 26, 2005 News Clips (Text) 26-Dec-2005
December 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Dec-2005
December 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Dec-2005
December 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Dec-2005
December 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Dec-2005
December 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Dec-2005
December 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Dec-2005
December 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Dec-2005
December 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Dec-2005
December 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Dec-2005
December 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Dec-2005
December 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Dec-2005
December 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Dec-2005
December 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Dec-2005
December 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Dec-2005
December 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Dec-2005
December 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Dec-2005
December 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Dec-2005
December 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Dec-2005
December 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Dec-2005
December 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Dec-2005
December 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Dec-2005
December 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Dec-2005
December 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Dec-2005
December 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Dec-2005
December 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Dec-2005
December 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Dec-2005
November 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Nov-2005
November 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Nov-2005
November 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Nov-2005
November 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Nov-2005
November 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Nov-2005
November 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Nov-2005
November 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Nov-2005
November 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Nov-2005
November 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Nov-2005
November 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Nov-2005
November 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Nov-2005
November 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Nov-2005
November 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Nov-2005
November 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Nov-2005
November 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Nov-2005
November 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Nov-2005
November 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Nov-2005
November 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Nov-2005
November 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Nov-2005
November 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Nov-2005
November 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Nov-2005
November 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Nov-2005
November 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Nov-2005
November 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Nov-2005
November 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Nov-2005
November 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Nov-2005
November 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Nov-2005
November 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Nov-2005
November 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Nov-2005
November 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Nov-2005
October 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Oct-2005
October 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Oct-2005
October 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Oct-2005
October 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Oct-2005
October 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Oct-2005
October 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Oct-2005
October 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Oct-2005
October 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Oct-2005
October 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Oct-2005
October 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Oct-2005
October 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Oct-2005
October 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Oct-2005
October 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Oct-2005
October 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Oct-2005
October 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Oct-2005
October 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Oct-2005
October 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Oct-2005
October 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Oct-2005
October 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Oct-2005
October 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Oct-2005
October 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Oct-2005
October 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Oct-2005
October 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Oct-2005
October 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Oct-2005
October 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Oct-2005
October 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Oct-2005
October 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Oct-2005
October 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Oct-2005
October 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Oct-2005
October 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Oct-2005
October 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Oct-2005
September 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Sep-2005
September 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Sep-2005
September 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Sep-2005
September 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Sep-2005
September 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Sep-2005
September 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Sep-2005
September 24. 2005 News Clips 24-Sep-2005
September 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Sep-2005
September 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Sep-2005
September 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Sep-2005
September 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Sep-2005
September 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Sep-2005
September 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Sep-2005
September 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Sep-2005
September 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Sep-2005
September 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Sep-2005
September 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Sep-2005
September 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Sep-2005
September 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Sep-2005
September 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Sep-2005
September 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Sep-2005
September 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Sep-2005
September 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Sep-2005
September 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Sep-2005
September 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Sep-2005
September 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Sep-2005
September 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Sep-2005
September 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Sep-2005
September 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Sep-2005
September 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Sep-2005
August 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Aug-2005
August 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Aug-2005
August 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Aug-2005
August 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Aug-2005
August 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Aug-2005
August 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Aug-2005
August 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Aug-2005
August 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Aug-2005
August 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Aug-2005
August 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Aug-2005
August 21, 2005 News Clips - Part 1 21-Aug-2005
August 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Aug-2005
August 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Aug-2005
August 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Aug-2005
August 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Aug-2005
August 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Aug-2005
August 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Aug-2005
August 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Aug-2005
August 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Aug-2005
August 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Aug-2005
August 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Aug-2005
August 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Aug-2005
August 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Aug-2005
August 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Aug-2005
August 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Aug-2005
August 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Aug-2005
August 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Aug-2005
August 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Aug-2005
August 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Aug-2005
August 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Aug-2005
August 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Aug-2005
July 31, 2005 News Clips 31-July-2005
July 30, 2005 News Clips 30-July-2005
July 29, 2005 News Clips 29-July-2005
July 28, 2005 News Clips 28-July-2005
July 27, 2005 News Clips 27-July-2005
July 26, 2005 News Clips 26-July-2005
July 25, 2005 News Clips 25-July-2005
July 24, 2005 News Clips 24-July-2005
July 23, 2005 News Clips 23-July-2005
July 22, 2005 News Clips 22-July-2005
July 21, 2005 News Clips 21-July-2005
July 20, 2005 News Clips 20-July-2005
July 19, 2005 News Clips 19-July-2005
July 18, 2005 News Clips 18-July-2005
July 17, 2005 News Clips 17-July-2005
July 16, 2005 News Clips 16-July-2005
July 15, 2005 News Clips 15-July-2005
July 14, 2005 News Clips 14-July-2005
July 13, 2005 News Clips 13-July-2005
July 12, 2005 News Clips 12-July-2005
July 11, 2005 News Clips 11-July-2005
July 10, 2005 News Clips 10-July-2005
July 9, 2005 News Clips 9-July-2005
July 8, 2005 News Clips 8-July-2005
July 7, 2005 News Clips 7-July-2005
July 6, 2005 News Clips 6-July-2005
 


 

Paid for by David John Diersen