GOPUSA ILLINOIS
  David John Diersen, GOPUSA Illinois Editor
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Weekly Poll
Welcome to CampaignSiteBuilder
April 9, 2006 News Clips
Posted by Diersen on 15-Mar-2007
FOR TEXT, SCROLL DOWN  
 
TOM ROESER
-- Judy Baar Topinka: Brass & Gas
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
-- Better than Chicago Tonight: Video-Streaming Tony Peraica - Jeff Berkowitz
PEORIA JOURNAL STAR
-- Politics the name of the game - Doug Finke
BELLEVILLE NEWS DEMOCRAT
-- Where are the jobs? - Editorial
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
-- Robert Novak: Headlines first Chicago Sun-Times/University of Illinois at Chicago forum. April 19 at UIC. Public invited. And blogger Sweet is part of the panel...
DAILY HERALD
-- Public scrutiny of voting problems needed - Editorial
-- Kane County speech controls go too far - Editorial
-- Herald showing bias in immigration story - Thomas P. Young
-- Loaded offensive questions Roskam should have asked Cheney - Walt Zlotow
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Daily Herald publishes Morgan Mader's anti-traditional marriage letter to the editor
(Not posted as of 6:00 AM)
NEWS SUN
-- Latinos to protest at Bean's office  Demonstration Monday: Supporters of immigrant rights - Ryan Pagelow
NAPERVILLE SUN
-- Responsible actions on building bills - Editorial
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Naperville Sun promotes illegal immigration and mass immigration, again
ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR
-- Editorial: "It seems Republicans are willing to bet that Judy Baar Topinka will be elected governor in November, and then they won't have to deal with Blagojevich and his crew."
ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI
-- Castrogiovanni announces bid to challenge Cook County Party Chairman, Gary Skoien for his seat
www.gopillinois.com (4/9/06 News Clips page)
URBANA/CHAMPAIGN NEWS-GAZETTE
-- House GOPs behind anonymous, automated phone calls - Kate Clements
 
GOPUSA ILLINOIS
Oberweis, Birkett, Hultgren, Fortner, Henry, Zaruba, Eckhoff, and Formento win in DuPage County Milton Township Precinct 9 - Dave Diersen
127 (31%) of the 410 registered voters in DuPage County Milton Township Precinct 9 pulled Republican ballots for the March 21 primary election.  In the contested elections, Jim Oberweis won with 48 (39%) of the 124 votes cast in the governor race, Joe Birkett won with 66 (54%) of the 122 votes cast in the lieutenant governor race, Randy Hultgren won with 108 (89%) of the 121 votes cast in the state senate race, Mike Fortner won with 73 (62%) of the 118 votes cast in the state representative race, Gwen Henry won with 89 (71%) of the 125 votes cast in the county treasurer race, John Zaruba won with 106 (88%) of the 121 votes cast in the county sheriff race, Grant Eckhoff won with 76 (63%) of the 120 votes cast in the county board race, and Mike Formento won with 67 (56%) of the 120 votes cast in the county forest preserve race.
 
By way of comparison, 97,459 (19%) of the 518,275 registered voters in DuPage County pulled Republican ballots for the March 21 primary election.  In DuPage County, Judy Baar Topinka won with 41,821 (44%) of the 96,094 votes cast in the governor race, Joe Birkett won with 59,584 (64%) of the 92,612 votes cast in the lieutenant governor race, Randy Hultgren won with 11,301 (64%) of the 17,662 votes cast in the state senate race, Mike Fortner won with 5,035 (59%) of the 8,592 votes cast in the state representative race, Gwen Henry won with 43,247 (51%) of the 85,420 votes cast in the county treasurer race, John Zaruba won with 62,974 (72%) of the 87,912 votes cast in the county sheriff race, Jerry McBride won with 8,604 (53%) of the 16,270 votes cast in the county board race, and Mike Formento won with 9,800 (59%) of the 16,523 votes cast in the county forest preserve race.
 
In my March 20 precinct letter (posted on the Files page of www.DiersenForMilton9.com), I endorsed Oberweis, Rauschenberger, Hultgren, Fortner, Henry, Zaruba, Eckhoff, and Formento.  Sadly, I am sure that certain past and present influential Milton Township Republican Central Committee (MTRCC) members are busy saying that my having either endorsed or not endorsed candidates in the primary race harmed the candidates and harmed the GOP.  Sadly, these same past and present influential MTRCC members also say that my attending a candidate's press conference harms that candidate and the GOP, that the GOPUSA ILLINOIS emails that I sent out daily harm the GOP, and that my having endorsed Pat O'Malley in the gubernatorial primary 4 years ago caused Jim Ryan to lose the general election 4 years ago.  I am sure that if any Republican candidates in Illinois do not win on November 7 this year, they will argue that I caused it. 
 
The beautiful and historic DuPage County Milton Township Precinct 9 is located south of downtown Wheaton and south of Roosevelt Road where it crosses the Illinois Prairie Path.  Its beautiful Prairie Path Park was the site of a historic July 5, 2003 picnic attended by all the announced U.S. Senate candidates at the time: John Cox, Chirinjeev Kathuria, Andy McKenna, Jim Oberweis, and Jack RyanSteve Rauschenberger subsequently joined the race.  Other picnic attendees included Alan Bolds, Liz Corry, Grant Eckhoff, Jim Flickinger, Jim Gumm, Gwen Henry, Ralph Hinkle, Randy Hultgren, Ed Kling, Bob Lyon, Barb Murphy, John Noel, Debra Olson, Mark Prutzman, Jim Rasins, Leonard Sanchez, Don Sender, Tim Whelan, and John Zahm.  For more information on the precinct, please visit www.DiersenForMilton9.com.  For information on homes for sale in the precinct, please contact Vance Eubanks at 630-665-1855.  Mr. Eubanks is with Baird & Warner which has an office in the precinct at 400 West Roosevelt Road.
 
TOM ROESER
Judy Baar Topinka: Brass & Gas
With Judy Baar Topinka, the Illinois GOP has a low-rent candidate…one who got away with being a saucy “irrepressible” character as a lower ballot figure…but whose mouth will continue to get her into trouble. When she isn't chain-smoking Marlboro’s she’s either talking about gas or addressing her opponents as morons. Remember the consternation from the mainstream Illinois media whenever Jim Oberweis expressed a non-politically correct view? When Gidwitz wasn't warm and cuddly? What you have here, folks, is double-standard as she unloads her verbal gas and most of the media look the other way and clear their throat with embarrassment. The accordion-player says the Governor has “little weasel eyes.” Classy.

Basically, she’s low-rent…sounds low-rent, is-low rent. Her language is low-rent. She tells George Will about the governor: “His staff rats him out”…”some of his staff have been wired”…all with no basis whatsoever. She’s Miss Duffy, daughter of the owner of Duffy’s Tavern (the oldsters will understand that). She’s cultural low-life. She couldn't back Fitzgerald as State Chairman because those who put her there wouldn't like it. Then after refusing to endorse him she denied she did that, when a vast radio audience heard her refuse to endorse.

The truth isn't in her. She’s pocket change as is her staff. Presumably the staffer quoted in Will’s column was Nancy Kimme. About the President, the staffer said, “We just want him to raise money.” He should come into town “late at night.” Where should he raise money for her? “In an undisclosed location.” Topinka had no comment at that point; just a giggle (until Will printed it and a staffer was sent out to fudge. Late at night and in an undisclosed location. That’s loyalty for a president who’s top political staffer fought for her to win, loyalty, too, to Bob Kjellander who had been lobbying the White House for her. He goes into the junk pile with all those who helped her on the way up-the social conservatives she disowned, the conservatives she once hung with and then defamed. What I never understood is what they once saw in her. One thing never changed: her being low rent.

I'll bet Kjellander loved that one-he who had been defending her all these months and now, when the president is down in the polls, Kjellander’s pick insults him (or her aide did without Topinka correcting it until it was published). If you wonder why she was the mainstream media favorite in the primary, now you know. They knew her. They knew she’s low rent. They've never been for her-just favoring the most liberal candidate. They'll not weep tears when she goes down. Why should they? They knew she would all along.

It all ratifies my original judgment about Topinka: I knew her since she was a state Rep. Light, light, light with a kind of endearing vulgarity that seems charming at first, but a Liza Higgins who never left the flower stall, who still says the political equivalent of “aooowww” and who can't grow. She started as a pro-lifer and sold out; she was State Treasurer for years, wanted to run for governor for years, and enters the primary without any in-depth program because she doesn't have any feel for governing. The primary debates, whenever she attended them, showed you she wasn't prepared-and she’s not prepared now. The debates with Blagojevich will feature him-with all his faults-as being the depth and content candidate, she being somewhat brassily vulgar, a rogue elephant, someone to giggle at but dismiss. In the GOP primary you had three who knew issues, were prepared, had been successes-plus one low-renter. That’s what she was, what she is and she'll go down like a ton of bricks. At least I hope so. The worst thing that could happen to this state, and to the Republican party she’s gulled, would be if she won.
 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Better than Chicago Tonight: Video-Streaming Tony Peraica - Jeff Berkowitz
Disappointing Date last night? Need an uplifting experience? Watch Tony Peraica, Republican nominee for Cook County Board President, on your computer, right now. [See here for the Podcast Page]. The video and audio podcast page has twenty recent episodes of "Public Affairs," including, in addition to Peraica, Congresswoman Bean [D- Barrington, 8th CD]; 8th CD Republican nominee David McSweeney [Barrington Hills]; Democratic State Rep. nominee Judith-Rae Ross [Skokie] and State Senator Ira Silverstein [D-Chicago].

Peraica discusses with show host Jeff Berkowitz, among many other topics, some potential replacements for Cook County Board President and County Board President Democratic nominee John Stroger, should the 76 year old incumbent President decide to take himself off the ballot due to the severe stroke he suffered a week before the March 21, 2006 Primary election. The possible replacements include some Great White Hopes, a number of African-Americans and some Hispanics.

However, the uplifting part of the show is Peraica's view that many, or even most, voters may make their choice in the general election based on who is the best candidate, not on the color of the candidate's skin. Paraphrasing Hemingway's character Jake's last line of the book, in a very different context in The Sun Also Rises, "Isn't it nice to think so." Indeed, for precedent, you need look no further than the 2004 Democratic U. S. Senate Primary, won going away by that skinny kid from the South Side of Chicago with the funny sounding name-- in an election said at the time to transcend race.
*******************************************************
"Public Affairs," is featuring Tony Peraica [R-Riverside] Republican Nominee for President of the Cook County Board, this week in 35 Chicago Metro suburbs on Comcast Cable; a week from this coming Monday night through-out the City of Chicago; And, on your computer, right now. [See here].

For more about Cook County Board issues and politics, See here.

For a partial transcript of the show with Tony Peraica, Republican nominee for Cook County Board President, see here.
 
PEORIA JOURNAL STAR
Politics the name of the game - Doug Finke

Gov. Rod Blagojevich showed up in Springfield on Tuesday - four days before the General Assembly's original adjournment date - to begin negotiating a budget.

Welcome back to work, Governor.

No politics here

Senate Democrats were shocked, shocked to find that people were playing politics with a construction bond program.

Blagojevich proposed a $3.2 billion plan for schools and roads that has languished because the Republicans won't vote for it. Because bonds need a three-fifths majority to pass, at least four Republican senators would have to vote for it.

Senate Democrats - without consulting either Blagojevich or House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago - did one better. Theirs was for $4.3 billion and it didn't raise taxes or fees to retire the bonds. Just take the bond payments out of the regular state budget, which of course has plenty of money.

Republicans complained about the financing plan. They also complained that they didn't trust Blagojevich to give Republicans any of the goodies if a bond program passed. They raised the point over and over during debate. Each time they did, Sen. Debbie Halvorson, D-Crete - who was presiding over the Senate at the time - admonished them for being political.

But at a committee hearing earlier, Senate President Emil Jones, D-Chicago, weighed in. He noted that the Republicans' own president, George Bush, is spending billions to build schools and other public buildings in Iraq.

"If you are willing to support the president of the United States putting billions into new schools in Iraq, why can't you support schools for Illinois," Jones scolded the Republicans.

Not that he was being political or anything.

One-upmanship

At the same time, Jones did raise a valid point.

Republicans complained they were left out of talks about a construction bond bill. But Jones said that for three years, Democrats and Republicans have talked about a construction bond bill, and it hasn't passed because Republicans wouldn't vote for it.

"It's a waste of time sitting down talking to you," Jones said. "You are going to find every excuse necessary not to help schoolchildren."

Substitute "vote for a bond bill" for the hyperbolic "help schoolchildren" and the point is well-taken. Whatever else they might say, Republicans don't want to hand Blagojevich a multibillion-dollar pork package in an election year. You sense they'd find some reason to reject it even if Blagojevich promised in writing to fund their projects and an absolutely painless payment system could be devised.

The Democrats knew this when they put out their program last week. They knew it would be voted down. However, they, and Blagojevich, still got something out of the deal. They got a record of Republicans voting against the little children and better roads and construction jobs.

At least that's how they'll portray it during campaign season.

Name recognition

Rep. Raymond Poe, R-Springfield, sent out about 8,000 letters to constituents (and apparently some nonconstituents) with the greeting "Dear Fellow State Employee."

The full-page letter recounts the issue of state pension underfunding. It also urges people to visit House Republican

Leader Tom Cross' Web site and sign a petition to release a pension reform bill bottled up by Madigan. Cross, not Poe, paid the $1,440 postage for the mailing.

Poe said he wanted to make his constituents "aware" of the pension issue. Oddly, Rep. Rich Brauer, R-Petersburg, didn't send a similar letter, even though he also has a lot of state employees in his district.

"There's a lot of good information (in Poe's letter), but most people won't understand it," Brauer said.

Brauer is unopposed for re-election while Poe has an opponent. But that probably has nothing to do with who is sending out letters.

Word from above

Thursday's thunderstorms temporarily put the Senate out of business.

Lightning struck the Illinois State Museum a few hundred feet away from the Capitol. Outside of setting off fire alarms, the strike caused no damage. However, it caused a power surge that knocked out the sound system in the Senate.

The sound system provides the official record of the Senate's activities and, without it, the chamber ground to a halt. Some spare parts were found for the system, and after a couple of hours' delay, things were back to normal.

Several senators quipped that the strike might be divine intervention, a hint to quit squabbling and pass a budget. It didn't work.

BELLEVILLE NEWS DEMOCRAT
Where are the jobs? - Editorial

Job creation is a central theme of Rod Blagojevich's re- election campaign. A changing banner at the top of his website proclaims "60,000 new jobs this past year."

The site also boasts: "Under Rod Blagojevich's leadership, Illinois has created 90,000 jobs in the past two years, despite inheriting the state's worst budget deficit and a recession."

As with most statistics Blagojevich presents, he has carefully selected numbers to tell only the part of the story that paints him in the best light.

A more accurate measure is the jobs creation record for his entire term, not just snippets of it.

We looked at statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor from January 2003, when Blagojevich took office, through February, the most current month available. The numbers are for all nonfarm jobs and are seasonally adjusted.

The job growth in Illinois during that period was an anemic 0.7 percent. The results are even worse when you realize that all our neighboring states had more robust growth during the same period.

Our state lagged not only in percentage growth, but in absolute numbers. Even though Illinois has more than twice as many jobs as any of these other states, it had the smallest number of new jobs created in the period, 39,500.

Jobs creation in Illinois is a campaign issue, all right -- one Republican challenger Judy Baar Topinka should be able to use to her advantage.

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
Robert Novak: Headlines first Chicago Sun-Times/University of Illinois at Chicago forum. April 19 at UIC. Public invited. And blogger Sweet is part of the panel...
Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak launches the Chicago Sun-Times/University of Illinois at Chicago Lecture Forum at an April 19 panel ``Inside Washington: Where Red States and Blue States Collide.''
 
"We are pleased to embark on our inaugural panel series with UIC. Our long-term commitment will be to address topics that reflect the diverse communities and cultures that both the university and the Sun-Times serve," said John Cruickshank, Chicago Sun-Times Publisher.
"We welcome the opportunity to join with one of the nation's major newspapers in hosting a forum that will give the public the opportunity to hear from, and question, leading experts from academia and journalism on vital issues of the day," said UIC Chancellor Sylvia Manning.
Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak launches the Chicago Sun-Times/University of Illinois at Chicago Lecture Forum at an April 19 panel analyzing Washington policies and politics.
"We are pleased to embark on our inaugural panel series with UIC. Our long-term commitment will be to address topics that reflect the diverse
communities and cultures that both the university and the Sun-Times serve," said John Cruickshank, Chicago Sun-Times Publisher.
"We welcome the opportunity to join with one of the nation's major newspapers in hosting a forum that will give the public the opportunity
to hear from, and question, leading experts from academia and journalism on vital issues of the day," said UIC Chancellor Sylvia Manning.
Novak, a native of Joliet who writes one of the nation?s premier Washington columns, will be part of a panel on ``Inside Washington: Where Red States and Blue States Collide?? moderated by Chicago Sun-Times political columnist Carol Marin.
Other panelists include Lori B. Andrews, a professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology's Chicago-Kent College of Law; Lyn Ragsdale, professor and head of political science at UIC; Lynn Sweet Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief and Maria de los Angeles Torres, professor and director of Latin
American and Latino Studies at UIC.
The forum will be held from 1-2:30 p.m. at UIC's Student Center East, 750 S. Halsted St., Room 302.
The program is free and open to the public,
but space is limited and registration is required. To register, call (312) 413-0151 or e-mail karenj@uic.edu.
 
DAILY HERALD
Public scrutiny of voting problems needed - Editorial
The polling place debacles during the presidential race almost six years ago should remind all of us how vital it is to design voting systems that are reliable. Even today, no one can be sure how accurate the vote tally was in that monumental race in Florida.

We don’t want the same thing to be said of Cook County some day.

The obligation of the clerk’s office is clear and simple: Every vote that is cast should be counted. Absolutely. The republic is founded on that notion.

But meeting that obligation may sometimes be more complex.

To be sure, the clerk’s office had its hands full during the primary election two weeks ago. It was the first election to include early voting. It was the first election to use touch-screen voting machines. It was the first election to use optical-scan balloting. It was one of those elections where, if anything could go wrong, it would. Officials in the clerk’s office knew that. In the days preceding the election, they warned that the results would be much later than normal, and that prediction certainly turned out to be correct — the outcome of at least one race wasn’t known for days.

Certainly, that delay is frustrating, but what’s much more important than the speed of the vote count is the accuracy of the vote count.

Over the years, we’ve been impressed with the professionalism of Clerk David Orr’s operation. But there were a number of new elements added to the mix on March 21, and the chaos in some precincts on Election Day suggests that a constructive public critique session is order.

Without a doubt, some votes were missing on election night, apparently not turned in or else delivered to the wrong place. This doesn’t have to be a crisis. The canvass seems to have found those votes and remedied the errors. But can we feel confident that every vote was, in fact, found? And has the clerk’s office been able to identify and develop a solution for all of the myriad problems that occurred?

Public hearings, in an unpoliticized atmosphere of problem-solving, would address all that. They would help identify problems and potential solutions. They would reassure the electorate that their votes count.

Orr has shown already that he is taking these problems seriously. He is suggesting procedural changes that, on their face, seem to make sense. But in doing so, he has attributed much of confusion to mistakes by election judges. He may be right, but not all election judges agree.

Hearings involving all interested parties would clear that up. Finger pointing is neither necessary nor helpful. But getting to the crux of the problems so they can be solved is what the business notion of continuous improvement is all about.

Too much is at stake to ignore that philosophy here.

Kane County speech controls go too far - Editorial

http://www.dailyherald.com/opinion/index.asp

Anyone who has regularly attended public meetings knows they are often boring, too long and peopled by speakers who are ill-informed, overly emotional and relentlessly repetitive.

That means we understand the inclination to want to limit speech and muzzle speakers, but we cannot condone Kane County’s rather brazen attempt to act on that inclination with rules that would undermine free speech rights granted in the Bill of Rights.

Among the more egregious suggested rules for public comment at Kane County Board meetings is a ban on “political” comment. Given every topic being discussed at a public meeting by a policy-making body is political in some way, we can only surmise that “political” will often be translated by board members to mean “anything that disagrees with us.”

That’s simply unacceptable, as are rules that preclude naming public employees or using “condemning” remarks. Given the thin skin of too many public servants when they are questioned, we can only imagine nearly all criticism will be viewed as “condemning” by many. Just to be sure public servants’ feathers are never ruffled, there’s also this classic: “No speaker shall debate any member of the county board.” That’s nothing short of repressive.

Furthermore, the county would require speakers to pre-register, provide personal contact information and say whether they are speaking for or against a topic. It also would give the board chairman the power to determine the order of speakers, all of whom would be required to fit in a 30-minute maximum discussion period for agenda items, or a 15-minute window for comment on items not on the agenda.

Yes, indeed, public speakers can be rude and uncivil, and their right to speak does not extend to personal attack, vulgarity and profanity. These rules, though, go far beyond ensuring such restraint. They are attempts to chill and control public comment in order to make the lives of public servants easier. They should grow thicker skins if they want to serve the public properly.

Controversial decisions of major impact require more than 30 minutes of public discussion. In fact, in such cases, public servants should be going out of their way to ensure everyone is heard, not limiting comment to the shortest possible time frame and to the voices they approve.

Speakers should be able to sign up at the time of the meeting without having to pre-state their views and be allowed to speak on a first-come, first-served basis. “Picking and choosing public comment based on the content of the comment violates the First Amendment,” says Sarah Klaper, a lawyer with the Citizen Advocacy Center in Elmhurst. We agree.

Enforce individual speaker and public comment length restrictions. But if there are too many speakers on a single subject to fit within the designated comment period, continue the discussion to another day and time devoted specifically to that topic.

Public servants are, after all, in place to serve the public, not silence it.

Herald showing bias in immigration story - Thomas P. Young 

http://www.dailyherald.com/opinion/fencepost.asp

Once again your paper is showing its bias, this time in Friday’s (March 31) lead article on immigration. If one only looks at the headline, “Let them stay here, 39 percent say,” you would think that the majority is on the side of the illegal immigrants. Going further into the story we find the following:

1) 39 percent is closer to only one third than it is to 50 percent or one-half;

2) the survey covered 801 people in the Chicago area, hardly a representative sample on any scale;

3) 56 percent of the people interviewed felt the illegal immigrants did not pay their fair share of taxes. If so , how can it not have an effect on the quality of education?

4) Thirty-five percent of the interviewees felt that immigration should be reduced.

I could go on but hopefully the point has been made. Your headline is misleading and one can only assume it represents the Daily Herald’s position on this matter. Report the news in an unbiased fashion and save your personal opinions for the Op-Ed page.

Loaded offensive questions Roskam should have asked Cheney - Walt Zlotow

http://www.dailyherald.com/opinion/fencepost.asp 

When you met recently with Vice President Cheney to accept his support to replace retiring Rep. Henry Hyde, did you have a chance to ask him:

Why he was one of the most ardent proponents of the unnecessary war of choice in Iraq, which has drained our precious military and treasury only to become an unending national nightmare?

Why he has consistently opposed efforts by Republican Sen. John McCain to curtail the practice of torture and forbid its future use under any circumstances by the U.S. government?

Why he has become the primary cheerleader of the illegal spying conducted by the Bush administration in violation of FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act)?

Why will he not reveal the substance of the secret meetings he held with major energy companies considering the impending energy crisis we face in America?

How he can justify the astounding increase in the deficit during his five years in office so his base of supporters can gorge on tax cuts?

How he can travel with the most modern medical personnel and equipment for his health issues while his administration does nothing for the 43 million of his fellow citizens with no health insurance?

Mr. Roskam, you need to address these issues because they will address you every day of this campaign until election day. We await your responses.

 
DIERSEN HEADLINE: Daily Herald publishes Morgan Mader's anti-traditional marriage letter to the editor
(Not posted as of 6:00 AM)

NEWS SUN

Latinos to protest at Bean's office  Demonstration Monday: Supporters of immigrant rights - Ryan Pagelow 

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/newssun/city/5_1_WA08_BEANPROTEST_S1.htm

Supporters of immigrant rights are planning a demonstration in front of the Schaumburg office of Democratic U.S. Rep. Melissa Bean on Monday at 11 a.m.

Rep. Bean voted for a bill that was approved in the House last year that would make it a felony to be in the United States without the proper immigration paperwork.

Latinos Organized for Justice, an immigrants' rights organization with the Illinois Hunger Coalition, is asking that she reverse her position on immigration and take a pro-immigrant stand.

"We contribute to our community as taxpayers. We mow the lawns, paint the houses and we fix the cars of people living in District 8," said Joel Ruiz, a leader of Latinos Organized for Justice and a deacon at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Round Lake. "We believe that we have a right to expect that she will represent all of the people in her district."

Three buses from Round Lake, Wauconda and Palatine will bring demonstrators on Monday.

A group of 250 Latinos mostly from Round Lake and Wauconda met with Rep. Bean in June during an immigration forum where they asked her to support a solution to bring immigrants out of the shadows and promote family reunification.

NAPERVILLE SUN

Responsible actions on building bills - Editorial

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/sunpub/naper/editorials/n09edit.htm

When Gov. Rod Blagojevich took office, the state was in a precarious fiscal position.

It still is, though he has jacked up fees to businesses and taken some other action in an attempt to appear fiscally responsible.

In the Illinois Senate in last week's waning days of the legislative session, two big spending bills were axed along strictly partisan lines — Democrats voted for them but even with their majority could not get them passed. They needed four Republicans to break ranks and support the bills, but none did so, and though each of the bills had a 32-26 majority they failed by four votes to gain passage.

Had the bills passed, they would have resulted in the state borrowing $4.3 billion — $1 billion for school construction and maintenance and $3.3 billion for roadwork, mass transit and college-building needs.

Supporters insisted the money could be paid back out of existing fuel tax revenues and the state's primary bank account, but those who opposed the bill said there was no reliable funding source built into the plan.

Republicans also expressed the opinion that the whole plan was a sham, intended to force them in an election year into opposing what could be considered programs that voters would like. After all, building schools and spending money on such things as higher education, mass transit and roads have a tendency to create a warm, fuzzy feeling in those who benefit from them.

To be sure, we'd like to see the state take more responsibility for educational spending, but not as an election-year gimmick in a state that still has money problems.

Sen. Rickey Hendon, D-Chicago, criticized Republicans harshly, saying "You should support the children of Illinois, even if you don't like Rod, even if you don't like me, even if you don't like (Illinois Senate) President (Emil) Jones."

We don't see this at all as a matter of who hates whom or who likes whom.

While building programs can be good, if needed, fiscal responsibility is more important, in our view.

We think the Republican minority acted responsibly and that state spending has to be restrained.

DIERSEN HEADLINE: Naperville Sun promotes illegal immigration and mass immigration, again

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/sunpub/naper/news/n09immig.htm

Securing their place in America, local immigrants work to live the American dream - Ann Hanson

Ling-Yan Matson, who came to the United States from China 10 years ago and is now living in Villa Park, is doing double duty — waiting tables and studying English — in her quest to live the American dream.

The ability to travel and change jobs easily attracted her to America. A waitress just for now, Ling-Yan said she would eventually like to work for the government or as a flight attendant when she becomes a citizen.

"You have very little choice (in China)," said Matson, who is more fortunate than most immigrants because she is is married to an American citizen. "The people, or most of the people, have one job their whole life. In the United States, you can change your job if you want."

After visiting the United States twice, she said she decided she wanted to make it her home.

"I chose to stay here because I think here I can do anything I want," she said.

In his work helping others like Ling-Yan secure their piece of the American dream, Jeremy Mains sees dozens of immigrants every week as an immigration counselor for World Relief DuPage. He knows the hopes of immigrants today are no different than they were 400 years ago.

"People come to the United States for the same reasons they have since the nation was founded," Mains said. "They come for opportunities, for freedom."

He said the immigration legislation being debated now in Congress will touch the lives of all of his clients.

"All of them are affected by this, even if their nation doesn't border the U.S.," he said.

Going nowhere

The Senate immigration bill, which suffered a possibly fatal blow Friday, would have provided for stronger border security, regulated the future entry of foreign workers and created a complex new set of regulations for the estimated 11 million immigrants in the country illegally. Officials said an estimated nine million of them, those who could show they had been in the United States for more than two years, would eventually become eligible for citizenship under the proposal.

Despite being hailed as a bipartisan breakthrough Thursday, Friday the bill fell victim to internal disputes in both parties as well as to bewildering political maneuvering. On the key vote, only 38 senators, all Democrats, lined up in support. That was 22 short of the 60 needed, and left the legislation in limbo as lawmakers left the Capitol for a two-week break.

"Obviously, it's a polarizing issue," Mains said.

'Secure our borders'

Rick Biesada is co-founder of the Chicago Minuteman Project and views the immigration legislation from a different perspective. While Main said his organization generally favors the McCain-Kennedy version of the legislation, Biesada said he and his group want to see tougher laws. They favor the House version of the bill, which would make it a felony offense to be in the country illegally.

"Our general thoughts are, it's not the greatest bill they've come up with, but it's a good bill," Biesada said of the House legislation. "It's the best bill that we're going to get."

Border protection is the primary focus of the minutemen, who, including Biesada, went to the Mexican-American border last year in an attempt to prevent people from coming into the country illegally.

"We have to secure our borders," he said. "That's the number one thing that we have to do. ... because it is my understanding that we're at war. The first thing you do when you're in a combat zone is secure the perimeters."

Mains doesn't argue the importance of border protection, but he said that can be accomplished without making criminals of the illegal immigrants here today.

"I feel that can be done in a spirit that recognizes the contributions of immigrants in this county," he said.

A new home

Carol Garcia, an English as a Second Language Specialist at College of DuPage, teaches citizenship classes to immigrants who hope to be naturalized. She said the students in her courses are usually green card holders, but the college is not required to verify their status.

One of the provisions of the McCain-Kennedy bill would be that illegal residents must learn English before they can become citizens. That's an exciting prospect for her students now, Garcia said.

"They're learning so many things and they're anxious to share that," she said. "They like to talk to native speakers."

This is just like one of her students, Ling-Yan Matson, who is willing to work long hours as a waitress to help her earn a most precious reward — American citizenship.

What polls say
Recent polls show that about six in 10 Americans oppose letting illegal immigrants remain in the country and apply for citizenship. Three of every four don't believe the government is doing enough to stem the continuing tide of new arrivals. The government says the number of illegal residents grows by half a million every year.

On the other hand, a poll of people who described themselves as legal immigrants, found that 68 percent said they supported temporary worker permits for illegal immigrants and a way for them to apply for residency after learning English and paying a fine. The survey was conducted by the firm Bendixen and Associates between Feb. 24 and March 21.

Illinois stat
According to the Pew Hispanic Center, about 4 percent of the undocumented population lives in Illinois. California has the most, at 24 percent, followed by Texas with 14 percent.

ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

Editorial: "It seems Republicans are willing to bet that Judy Baar Topinka will be elected governor in November, and then they won't have to deal with Blagojevich and his crew."
A fork in the roads plan: It's not well done in Illinois - Editorial

Illinois residents better invest in good pairs of walking shoes — or heavy-duty shock absorbers — because it doesn’t look like there will be agreement on a capital plan to build and fix roads in the state any time soon.

That makes three years without a capital plan and it’s unlikely anything will change until next year’s spring legislative session.

The latest silliness hit Springfield on Thursday. Senate Democrats proposed a $4.3 billion plan, which far exceeded the $3.2 billion plan Gov. Rod Blagojevich proposed in his State of the State address.

Democrats knew there was no way Republicans would support a plan that cost more and didn’t have any details about where the money was going. It was a thinly veiled attempt to make Republicans look bad. Republican votes are needed to achieve the three-fifths super-majority it takes to approve the debt the new bonds would create, but instead of offering up a plan Republicans could at least consider, Democrats proposed outrageous spending.

Democrats will hit the campaign trail and proclaim that they wanted more jobs and better roads — not to mention much-needed school construction — but Republicans wouldn’t cooperate. Republicans will counter that they would have considered a reasonable spending plan, but were not presented with anything reasonable.

The governor’s $3.2 billion plan is more reasonable than what Democrats tried to pass Thursday, but Republicans are concerned about how the governor will pay for it.

“For three years now I have said I will vote for a plan that identifies a revenue stream and provides details about how the money will ultimately be spent,” said state Sen. Dave Syverson of Rockford in a statement. “But for three years the governor has failed to identify how the state will pay for the new debt, refused to provide proof that the projects will be fair and geographically balanced, and any assurance that promises made will be kept.”

The governor and his staff can roll out all kinds of charts and graphics to explain how the state can afford the $3.2 billion spending plan, which includes about $113 million for projects in the Rockford area, but Republicans say they don’t trust the governor or his numbers.

Partisan politics have hit an all-time high — or is that low? — in Springfield. The only bipartisanship we see is agreeing to disagree.

It seems Republicans are willing to bet that Judy Baar Topinka will be elected governor in November, and then they won’t have to deal with Blagojevich and his crew. That’s not a very good bet when federal dollars also are at stake. The Illinois Congressional delegation, which has shown it can work across party lines, brought a record $6.1 billion in federal transportation money home.

That money will go to waste unless the state antes up its share, about 20 percent of the cost of each project.

The spring legislative session was supposed to be a quick one. Lawmakers were hoping to adjourn Friday so they could get on the campaign trail early to tout all the wonderful bills they supported and passed.

It looks like lawmakers will be in session for another week and then potential voters can get ready for vigorous whining about who is really letting you down.

There’s always hope for the remaining days of the session, but we don’t see any potential for conciliation when Democrats and Republicans are so firmly entrenched that neither side seems willing to listen to the other.

We’ll just lace up our shoes and wait until next year.

ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI

Castrogiovanni announces bid to challenge Cook County Party Chairman, Gary Skoien for his seat

www.gopillinois.com (4/9/06 News Clips page)

Text of letter sent the Cook County Committeemen:

With the March 21st Primary behind us, it is time for us to look toward the future of this Party, it’s leadership and it’s candidates. We have great opportunities before us to win state and county-wide offices this November, however, this can only be achieved if certain issues are addressed:

Gary Skoien has announced his bid for re-election as chairman of the Cook County Central Committee. While Gary has attempted to lead the Central Committee forward, he has failed in the most paramount of his duties; that of unifying the committeemen and our Party. He has allowed Committeeman Anthony J. Peraica of Lyon’s Township, the privilege of acting as the tutelary head of our Central Committee, to the exclusion of most all of the CCRCC membership. Peraica has been divisive in his blatant and public invasions into other committeemen’s townships, supporting and endorsing Democrat candidates over solid, principled Republican candidates. In a recent municipal election Peraica supported an independent Democrat who had an extensive criminal arrests / convictions record with at least one of them being a felony conviction. These coup d’états were carried out with Gary’s full knowledge and he did nothing to stop them. Nero fiddled while Rome burned. Gary has refused to remove Peraica from any of the appointed positions which he holds on the Central Committee. This is not leadership, this is reckless abandon.
 
Out of all of the candidates running for Cook County public office, Peraica is the only one that has refused to sign the Candidates Campaign Code of Conduct which would hold him to a standard of ethical conduct that he routinely and wantonly, violates.
 
Recently, Peraica has verbally assaulted several of our women colleagues. Among them; former Illinois State Representative Eileen Lyons (also a cancer survivor); Cook County Commissioner Elizabeth Doody-Gorman; Cook County Board of Review Commissioner Maureen Murphy; and Illinois State Senator Christine Radogno, Republican candidate for Illinois State Treasurer. I don’t think that calling these women “cowards” or “scum bags” shows any level of respect for them as colleagues or as women. Demonizing a cancer survivor is just as unsavory as it is malicious. Peraica’s stock-in-trade, canned answer to any opposition is always that his opponents are either Democrats or under the influence of former Chicago alderman, Ed Vrdolyak.
 
Peraica has run for high public office three times as a Democrat and lost. The above mentioned ladies have never run for public office as Democrats, they are Republicans. When Peraica decided to try his luck with the Republican Party in 2002, who do you think Peraica went to for “help?” Ed Vrdolyak! I’m confused...is Mr. Vrdolyak one of the “good” guys or one of the “bad” guys? Peraica seems to have a penchant for sullying the reputations of good people when it’s in his own self-interest, while Gary Skoien is content to play Bounty Hunter at the expense and embarrassment of our Party.
 
We are at a very crucial point in the history of the Party with a precedent setting number of women on the November ballot. By Peraica’s offhanded and offensive comments about our female colleagues, I believe that he has become a liability that may just cost us the Governorship. Twenty-three out of the eighty committeemen are women. What’s Gary Skoien doing through all of this? Absolutely nothing.
 
You may be wondering why so much of this letter is focused on Peraica instead of Skoien. The answer is simple: When you elect a chairman you expect them to lead, not follow. You expect them to hold themselves and their representatives to the highest standards of conduct, no exceptions. In my opinion, Anthony J. Peraica and Gary J. Skoien are at one. A vote for Skoien is a vote for Peraica and a vote for Peraica is a vote for us to close up shop and give into the Democrat Machine that Peraica still enjoys a flirtatious relationship with.
 
It’s time for a change...it’s time for a leader who builds bridges rather than burns them down. I have forged relationships, over these last four years, with many of our fellow committeemen as well as helped some of them establish their organizations, create by-laws and get them networked with other principled Republicans to help build our Party. I have stood my ground for what our Party stands for and I have never compromised myself. I have never sought office for personal gain. I have served in the fields of medicine, law enforcement and criminal justice. I have been in public service my whole adult life. I consider my position as committeeman a public service, as I am sure that you do as well. I want to build a county organization that is both financially sound and is inclusive of all committeemen. I am asking you to place your vote and your trust in me for chairman. I promise to work with you in building your organization and visibility. I will support you in your community and consider you as my equal and nothing less. As my colleague, elected by your constituents, I will seek your input, expertise and cooperation in all facets of reinventing the Cook County Republican Central Committee. I believe in teamwork, not in overblown egos. We have a tremendous group of talented committeemen, unfortunately, under Gary Skoien’s tenure, we have seen the game played by a handful of select players while the real talent sits on the bench. Under my leadership all committeemen will be given equal and fair opportunity to share in the spotlight of our achievements.
 
We may not have it all together, but!...together, we can have it all. I look forward to rolling up my sleeves on April 20th, as your chairman, and getting to work on making sure that our Republican candidates get elected in November...are you with me?

URBANA/CHAMPAIGN NEWS-GAZETTE

House GOPs behind anonymous, automated phone calls - Kate Clements
SPRINGFIELD – Anonymous, automated phone calls some Champaign-Urbana residents received this week were part of an orchestrated effort by House Republicans that targeted state Rep. Naomi Jakobsson, D-Urbana, and at least a dozen of her Democrat colleagues.

The calls criticized the lawmakers by name for their support of a two-year reduction in state pension contributions, which was part of a law enacted last summer, and for other budget practices, like sweeping cash from dedicated state funds to pay for general operations.

"It's unfortunate that a group has resorted to anonymous misleading scare tactics just to score political points in an election year," said a written statement from Jakobsson calling the phone messages inaccurate. "I am confident that the people of the Champaign-Urbana area will see through gimmicks like anonymous telephone calls."

Jakobsson's Republican opponent, Rex Bradfield, issued a statement on Thursday saying he was not behind the calls and had not heard any of them.

Later on Thursday, David Dring, spokesman for House Minority Leader Tom Cross, said House Republicans paid for the calls.

"We think the citizens of Illinois deserve to know that their pensions are being raided and that this budget puts the state in dangerous fiscal condition," Dring said. "Everything in these phone calls is accurate information."

Dring said it was not necessary for the calls to disclose who was paying for them because they were "public policy calls," not political calls aimed an influencing an election.

"This is not about politics," he said. "This is about informing the citizens and trying to save the state from the reckless policies that the Democrats are pursuing."

Dring said the calls cost less than $10,000, and the money came from the House Republican Organization, a campaign fund controlled by Cross and state Rep. Angelo "Skip" Saviano, R-Elmwood Park.

House Democrats denounced the calls as "cowardly and false," and said they should have identified who was behind them.

Steve Brown, spokesman for House Speaker Michael Madigan, said calls were received by residents in at least 13 Democrat House districts. They included the districts of : Jakobsson; state Rep. Dan Beiser, D-Alton; state Rep. Mike Boland, D-Moline; state Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion; state Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia, D-Aurora; state Rep. Bob Flider, D-Mt. Zion; state Rep. Careen Gordon, D-Coal City; state Rep. Tom Holbrook, D-Belleville; state Rep. Karen May, D-Highland Park; state Rep. Brandon Phelps, D-Norris City; state Rep. Kathleen Ryg, D-Vernon Hills; state Rep. Mike Smith, D-Canton; and state Rep. Patrick Vershoore, D-Milan. State Rep. Kurt Granburg, D-Carlyle, also received reports of calls in his district.

According to Dring, the following is the text of one of the calls that went out in Jakobsson's district: "This is a public pension alert. Your pension may be in jeopardy. Your state representative, Naomi Jakobsson, supports diverting over $1.1 billion in payments to your pension and instead wants to spend them on frivolous pork projects throughout the state. Illinois currently has the worst-funded pension system in the nation, and by voting for this budget, your representative, Naomi Jakobsson, would make it worse. Call Representative Jakobsson's office at 373-5000 and tell her to fully fund our pension system."

At issue is legislation the Democrat-controlled General Assembly approved last May. The measure reduced some benefits for future hires and cut the state's expected pension contributions by about $1.2 billion this year and $1.1 billion next year, freeing up that money for other state operating expenses.

Republicans in the General Assembly uniformly opposed any reduction in payments to state pension systems, which already have the largest unfunded liability of any state in the nation. They are demanding that the state replace the pension funds that were diverted this year and halt the diversion planned for the coming year, but Democrat budget negotiators have shown little interest.

In her statement, Jakobsson said pension benefits are guaranteed by the state constitution and that the bill she supported reduced long-term pension liability while preventing cuts to important state services.

"I deplore these desperate attempts to confuse and scare constituents in the 103rd District by falsely claiming that their retirement benefits are in jeopardy," she stated. "I would never support legislation that would put anyone's retirement security at risk."

Bradfield took issue with Jakobsson's position.

"It makes no sense to assert a pension system is strengthened by taking money away from or not contributing to it," he stated. "Any person with a savings account can understand, if you stop putting money in that account, it doesn't get stronger."

A different version of the automated call reportedly claimed that the lawmaker in question wants to take money away from important state programs, including programs for veterans, and use it to balance the state budget or to pay for spending in other communities. The transcript of that call was not made available.

The governor's proposed budget for the year beginning July 1 would skim about $144 million from variety of special state funds, which the administration said had built up excess balances over the years that were not being used. The list of funds that would be affected in the coming year has not yet been finalized, but funds that have been swept in recent years include the Illinois Veterans Rehabilitation Fund, the Youth Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Fund, the Coal Mining Regulatory Fund and the Sex Offender Registration Fund.

Republicans oppose taking money collected for and intended for a specific purpose and using it for something else, but Democrats have defended the practice as an important budgeting tool.

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December 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Dec-2005
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