GOPUSA ILLINOIS
  David John Diersen, GOPUSA Illinois Editor
      Home
      Events
      Subscribe
      2014 Clips
      2013 Clips
      2012 Clips
      2011 Clips
      2010 Clips
      11/08-12/09
      7/07-11/08
      3/07-7/07
      6/05-3/07
      Candidates
      Files
      About
      Reasons
      Articles
      Bio
      Contact
 
Weekly Poll
Welcome to CampaignSiteBuilder
February 24, 2007 News Clips
Posted by Diersen on 15-Mar-2007

FOR TEXT SCROLL DOWN

DIERSEN: Candidates who run as Republicans in Illinois should be required to fully disclose during primaries which, if any, of the planks in the Illinois Republican Party platform they will not advance if elected.
 
DAILY HERALD
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: NOT SUPRISING: Outrageously, the Daily Herald argues that Dillard is stepping down as DuPage County Republican Central Committee (DCRCC) Chairman because of opposition to his efforts to "find a new direction" for the party and because of opposition to his "opening up the party to minorities, women and young people" - Of course, Combine Members, Democrats, and RINOs will agree with the Daily Herald - But tragically, DCRCC has been dominated for years by anti-conservatives who promote George Ryan   
THE EDITORIAL: GOP leader tired of the Tylenol: State Sen. Kirk Dillard is thinking of stepping down as chairman of the DuPage County Republican Party at the end of his term next year. His motivation for doing so can be summed up in his own words. Dillard said the job has become a “gigantic headache” in terms of a time commitment. And no doubt it’s been a struggle for county Republicans to find a new direction in the post-James “Pate” Philip era. But Dillard deserves praise, particularly for his dedication to opening up the party to minorities, women and young people.
-- VERY SAD: New lawmakers tip the stem cell research debate in state Senate - 
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Other suburban legislators weren’t convinced, saying that while they support stem cell research, their moral compasses guided them toward a “no” vote. “Naturally, we all want cures for diseases. The question is, what are we willing to sacrifice to get them?” said state Sen. Chris Lauzen, an Aurora Republican. This isn’t the first time Illinois has debated stem cell research. A similar measure appeared before legislators two years ago, moving through the House but faltering in the Senate. Part of the difference this time was three suburban Democrats who voted with the majority Friday had replaced Republican senators who’d opposed the research funding. After the unsuccessful statewide measure and federal stem cell research restrictions, Gov. Rod Blagojevich used his executive power to create the Illinois Regenerative Medicine Institute. To date, it has awarded $15 million for various forms of stem cell research. Noting that there is a difference between naturally and lab-created embryos, the source for most stem cell research, Sen. Kirk Dillard said it is counterintuitive to discard cells that could save lives. “They go into the public sewer system,” the Hinsdale Republican said. “I really believe that my maker would want me use these embryos to sustain and improve human life.”)
-- No road relief for Wood Dale  Unsure of federal  funding, Division Street plan dead, mayor says - 
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/dupagestory.asp?id=284758&cc=d&tc=&t=
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Up until Friday, the plan had been to use that money to fund part of a much more ambitious plan that included the rerouting of Irving Park Road to the north and the construction of an underpass at Grove Street. But both versions of that plan have been controversial because each would have taken out homes and businesses. And with the influential Henry Hyde of Wood Dale now retired from Congress, Johnson said he was skeptical about Washington ever coughing up the remaining funding needed. “Can we count on a freshman congressman (Republican Peter Roskam of Wheaton) in a minority party to get us $30 million?” Johnson said. “Our federal people tell us no, so we’ll just have to hope we can use that $11 million we already have to increase safety some other way.” Roskam spokesman John D. Goodwin Jr. said the congressman is committed to helping ease gridlock and improve transportation in his district.)
-- ‘Kindness, integrity’  Mourners recall traits of former DuPage chief judge Alfred Woodward -
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/dupagestory.asp?id=284682&cc=d&tc=&t=
-- DIERSEN POSITION: Like it or not, English is the universal language of the world - Speaking a common language, English, is a major reason why America is strong today - Bilingualism harms America and therefore harms the world - To succeed not only in America, but in the world, speak English - Of course, multinationals, mass immigration advocates, illegal immigration advocates, and others who put their own interests ahead of America's interests push bilingualism - With rare exception, for example, for interpreters, to give preference to someone in America who speaks a language other than English is to discriminate against someone who only speaks English
ABC7
-- Illinois House schedules rare joint committee on electric rates - AP
CHICAGO TRIBUNE
-- VERY SAD: Illinois Senate approves stem-cell bill - Ray Long and Rick Pearson
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
-- VERY SAD: Senate OKs stem cell research - Dave McKinney
http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/health/270895,CST-NWS-stemcell24.article
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Sen. Kirk Dillard (R-Hinsdale), whose wife suffers from Crohn's disease, said life begins in the womb, not in the laboratory, where embryos are created for in vitro fertilization and are routinely discarded. "They go into the public sewer system. I really believe my maker would want me to use these embryos to sustain and improve human life," said Dillard, who voted for the bill.)
DES MOINES REGISTER
-- Include all candidates (including John Cox) - Dave Cooper, Altoona
(THE LETTER: The Feb. 19 story on Republican candidates left John Cox out ("Which Republican Is Right for Iowa's GOP?"). This is how qualified candidates get left out at the beginning. It is the Register's responsibility to include all candidates in your coverage until they have pulled out of the race. Cox is a true conservative who represents many of my positions. I encourage the Register to offer him the same coverage you offer the others.)
BLOOMINGTON PANTAGRAPH
-- OUTSTANDING: Law would force girls to tell family before abortion - Mike Riopell
LAKE COUNTY NEWS-SUN
-- Two candidates challenge Zion mayor's re-election - A.J. Goldsmith
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Ratliff says that he has been endorsed by Jim Oberweis, a business leader and former Republican candidate for Illinois' governor.)
COURIER NEWS
-- Carpentersville board hopefuls face decision today  4 contested races: Each one supports Illegal Immigration Relief Act proposal - Ben Lefebvre
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Trustees and some residents have said they find a disturbing pattern in the objections, noting the candidates' support of the Illegal Immigration Relief Act. Neither Brown nor Berreles have appeared at village board hearings. Neither returned phone calls seeking comment. Concern for the law Ibendahl, also an attorney for the Family Taxpayers Network and chairman of the Republican Young Professionals of Illinois, said his work on the objections is "absolutely not" connected to those groups. Instead, he said, his concern was candidates following the letter of the electoral law. "We wouldn't be going through this process right now if these things had been sufficiently filed," Ibendahl said. "People need to follow the law. That's what this is all about. Some of these candidates had some major problems with their signatures." Sigwalt disputes that, however, saying she thinks at least some of the objections were frivolous. "I have one gentlemen who came over to pick up his affidavit because Ibendahl protested how the 't' was crossed in his middle name," she said. "People's signatures change over the years as they age, or they have a stroke or other medical issues. My mother was one of the people they challenged. When she filled out her registration card, she was much younger. She's 84 years old now.")
ILLINOIS FAMILY INSTITUTE
-- Very Sad: Illinois Senate Passes Embryonic Stem Cell and Cloning Bill
ILLINOIS REVIEW
-- Two life votes reveal Belloch's and Froehlich's mettle - Fran Eaton
ILLINOIS POLICY INSTITUTE
-- The Really Gross 'Gross Receipts Tax' - Greg Blankenship
 
GOPUSA ILLINOIS
What are the Combine's current top priorities? - Dave Diersen
-- Elect Hillary as President and Obama as Vice President
-- Vindicate and promote George Ryan and his supporters
-- Keep Kjellander in office and destroy or buy off everyone who has called for Kjellander to resign
-- Stop everyone who the Combine cannot dominate from running for any political office, especially for Durbin's and Hastert's seats
-- Reelect all Illinois Democrat incumbents, especially Durbin, and reelect all Republican incumbents who the Combine can dominate
-- Stop the Illinois Republican Party from filling its Executive Director position unless it fills it with someone who the Combine can dominate and/or with someone who will not be effective
-- Destroy or buy off everyone who defends the Republican Assembly of Lake County
-- Destroy or buy off everyone who really wants to return to direct election of IRP State Central Committee members  
-- Get everyone to say that the more planks in the Republican platform you support, the more divisive you are
-- Destroy or buy off anyone who says they are a "conservative" or a "Platform Republican"
-- Get people on the 2008 IRP Platform Committee who will move the next IRP Platform to the left
-- Get voters who the Combine can dominate or buy off, especially limousine liberals and people who demand government assistance, to move to DuPage County
 
DAILY HERALD
DIERSEN HEADLINE: NOT SUPRISING: Outrageously, the Daily Herald argues that Dillard is stepping down as DuPage County Republican Central Committee (DCRCC) Chairman because of opposition to his efforts to "find a new direction" for the party and because of opposition to his "opening up the party to minorities, women and young people" - Of course, Combine Members, Democrats, and RINOs will agree with the Daily Herald - But tragically, DCRCC has been dominated for years by anti-conservatives who promote George Ryan 
THE EDITORIAL: GOP leader tired of the Tylenol: State Sen. Kirk Dillard is thinking of stepping down as chairman of the DuPage County Republican Party at the end of his term next year. His motivation for doing so can be summed up in his own words. Dillard said the job has become a “gigantic headache” in terms of a time commitment. And no doubt it’s been a struggle for county Republicans to find a new direction in the post-James “Pate” Philip era. But Dillard deserves praise, particularly for his dedication to opening up the party to minorities, women and young people.
 
VERY SAD: New lawmakers tip the stem cell research debate in state Senate - 
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Other suburban legislators weren’t convinced, saying that while they support stem cell research, their moral compasses guided them toward a “no” vote. “Naturally, we all want cures for diseases. The question is, what are we willing to sacrifice to get them?” said state Sen. Chris Lauzen, an Aurora Republican. This isn’t the first time Illinois has debated stem cell research. A similar measure appeared before legislators two years ago, moving through the House but faltering in the Senate. Part of the difference this time was three suburban Democrats who voted with the majority Friday had replaced Republican senators who’d opposed the research funding. After the unsuccessful statewide measure and federal stem cell research restrictions, Gov. Rod Blagojevich used his executive power to create the Illinois Regenerative Medicine Institute. To date, it has awarded $15 million for various forms of stem cell research. Noting that there is a difference between naturally and lab-created embryos, the source for most stem cell research, Sen. Kirk Dillard said it is counterintuitive to discard cells that could save lives. “They go into the public sewer system,” the Hinsdale Republican said. “I really believe that my maker would want me use these embryos to sustain and improve human life.”)
 
SPRINGFIELD — With a boost from freshmen suburban Democrats, the Illinois Senate overcame past political obstacles Friday and approved a controversial plan to use state tax dollars for stem cell research.

The measure passed 35-23 and will now go to the Illinois House where it’s enjoyed bipartisan support in the past. House Republican leader Tom Cross, of Oswego, said the House would vote on a similar plan next week.

“This is just one step,” said Comptroller Dan Hynes, a strong stem cell research supporter. “We knew that our biggest obstacle, our biggest hurdle, was going to be the Illinois Senate. We crossed that hurdle with great ease.”

Researchers have lauded embryonic stem cells as the link to curing juvenile diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other diseases. But opponents raise ethical questions about destroying human embryos in the name of science.

State Sen. Linda Holmes has heard too many stories about loved ones lost to diseases that might have been cured. Her own life changed 18 years ago when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The verdict is still out on the impact that stem cells can have on certain diseases, but the Aurora Democrat said the possibilities are enough to convince her.

“Do we know for sure if stem cell research will lead to a cure or the elimination of any catastrophic illnesses? No, we don’t know that,” Holmes said. “But do we owe it to ourselves to find out if it can? Absolutely.”

Other suburban legislators weren’t convinced, saying that while they support stem cell research, their moral compasses guided them toward a “no” vote.

“Naturally, we all want cures for diseases. The question is, what are we willing to sacrifice to get them?” said state Sen. Chris Lauzen, an Aurora Republican.

This isn’t the first time Illinois has debated stem cell research. A similar measure appeared before legislators two years ago, moving through the House but faltering in the Senate. Part of the difference this time was three suburban Democrats who voted with the majority Friday had replaced Republican senators who’d opposed the research funding.

After the unsuccessful statewide measure and federal stem cell research restrictions, Gov. Rod Blagojevich used his executive power to create the Illinois Regenerative Medicine Institute. To date, it has awarded $15 million for various forms of stem cell research.

Noting that there is a difference between naturally and lab-created embryos, the source for most stem cell research, Sen. Kirk Dillard said it is counterintuitive to discard cells that could save lives.

“They go into the public sewer system,” the Hinsdale Republican said. “I really believe that my maker would want me use these embryos to sustain and improve human life.”

No road relief for Wood Dale  Unsure of federal  funding, Division Street plan dead, mayor says - 
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/dupagestory.asp?id=284758&cc=d&tc=&t=
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Up until Friday, the plan had been to use that money to fund part of a much more ambitious plan that included the rerouting of Irving Park Road to the north and the construction of an underpass at Grove Street. But both versions of that plan have been controversial because each would have taken out homes and businesses. And with the influential Henry Hyde of Wood Dale now retired from Congress, Johnson said he was skeptical about Washington ever coughing up the remaining funding needed. “Can we count on a freshman congressman (Republican Peter Roskam of Wheaton) in a minority party to get us $30 million?” Johnson said. “Our federal people tell us no, so we’ll just have to hope we can use that $11 million we already have to increase safety some other way.” Roskam spokesman John D. Goodwin Jr. said the congressman is committed to helping ease gridlock and improve transportation in his district.)

Division Street, we hardly knew ya.

Less than two weeks ago, a new, extended Division Street was introduced as part of a long-planned major overhaul of Wood Dale’s notorious intersection of Wood Dale Road, Irving Park Road and the train tracks.

Now city officials are denouncing the Division Street extension — and even questioning the future of the entire project.

“Division Street is dead and buried, so that’s done,” Mayor Ken Johnson said Friday. “But on the flip side, it’s now debatable whether we’ll ever see the remaining federal dollars necessary to do any (overpass) at all.”

The latest plans for both remaining alternates included an extension of Division Street west from the Metra station lot to Oakwood Drive, just 15 feet from Holy Ghost Church and School.

Johnson said the city nixed those plans after public outcry against them at a Feb. 13 public hearing.

The Rev. Kevin Farrell had called the Division Street extension, which would have disconnected the church from its parking lot and the school from its playground, disastrous.

“The demise of that plan is great news,” Farrell said Friday. “I’m very proud of the aldermen for being honorable people and realizing it wasn’t safe.”

Several aldermen said the decision to add the Division extension was the last straw, convincing them to redirect their support for a “no build” alternative, which effectively leaves the intersection alone.

“I’ve changed my mind to support ‘no build’ even though I wanted (another option) at first,” 1st Ward Alderman Joe Kolz said. “But after this Division Street fiasco, I’m against doing anything. We should just improve it the best we can with the … money we have.”

Johnson said the city might simply use the $11 million in federal funds already secured to make more modest safety improvements.

Up until Friday, the plan had been to use that money to fund part of a much more ambitious plan that included the rerouting of Irving Park Road to the north and the construction of an underpass at Grove Street.

But both versions of that plan have been controversial because each would have taken out homes and businesses. And with the influential Henry Hyde of Wood Dale now retired from Congress, Johnson said he was skeptical about Washington ever coughing up the remaining funding needed.

“Can we count on a freshman congressman (Republican Peter Roskam of Wheaton) in a minority party to get us $30 million?” Johnson said. “Our federal people tell us no, so we’ll just have to hope we can use that $11 million we already have to increase safety some other way.”

Roskam spokesman John D. Goodwin Jr. said the congressman is committed to helping ease gridlock and improve transportation in his district.

Johnson suggested better gates at the intersection could prevent cars from driving around them, and the city’s “cop in the box” surveillance program will continue. That solution, however, would do nothing to shorten daily delays at the intersection.

Third Ward Alderman Dan Shawke said the plans’ death could be cause for celebration.

“The mayor has told a good story here today, so now I want to see it in writing at the (Thursday) city council meeting,” he said. “That will be a happy day for the city of Wood Dale.”

‘Kindness, integrity’  Mourners recall traits of former DuPage chief judge Alfred Woodward -
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/dupagestory.asp?id=284682&cc=d&tc=&t=

A tireless work ethic, strong moral compass and simple, modest charm propelled Alfred Woodward to success.

One by one, friends and colleagues of the former DuPage County lawyer, chief judge and appellate court judge recalled how those traits influenced their own lives.

More than 100 people filed into the First Presbyterian Church of Wheaton Friday morning to pay their final respects to Woodward. He died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at age 93.

S. Louis Rathje, a former law partner, displayed the legal pad and paper he used to outline his remarks.

“Why did I bring one?” he asked. “Because every time Al called, I better have had one around.”

Leslie Swallow, Woodward’s granddaughter, recalled the bond she forged with him during a summer together at the family cottage in Michigan.

He asked her at the end of their trip — in his typically quiet and deliberate tone — whether she was sure she really wanted to end their time together to start fall college classes.

And Susan Whall, Woodward’s oldest daughter, noted that her famous brother, Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward, interviewed the family to elicit anecdotes to retell during the services.

The prep work was a hallmark trait of their dad, along with his methodical approach in teaching them the difference between right and wrong.

“He was a consistent man,” she said. “He treated us with kindness, integrity and decency.”

While in total, eight people reflected on Woodward’s life, it was his famous son who held court during the 90-minute service.

Bob Woodward recalled the time when, as a 16-year-old driving his sister to Chicago, he accidentally broke her nose while fighting over which station they’d listen to during the car ride.

His father spent the evening lecturing him on how his actions provoked the tussle.

He accused Bob of being morally wrong for hitting a woman, and recounted cases where he’s represented victims of domestic violence.

And then he turned around and had a similar discussion with Bob’s sister, similarly scolding her for prompting the fight for control of the car radio.

“You know, that was Dad,” Bob Woodward said. “He instinctively knew there were two sides, three sides, nine sides to every story.”

Alfred Woodward was buried at Wheaton Cemetery following the funeral service.

-- DIERSEN POSITION: Like it or not, English is the universal language of the world - Speaking a common language, English, is a major reason why America is strong today - Bilingualism harms America and therefore harms the world - To succeed not only in America, but in the world, speak English - Of course, multinationals, mass immigration advocates, illegal immigration advocates, and others who put their own interests ahead of America's interests push bilingualism - With rare exception, for example, for interpreters, to give preference to someone in America who speaks a language other than English is to discriminate against someone who only speaks English

http://www.dailyherald.com/news/dupagestory.asp?id=284661&cc=d&tc=&t=

Earlier learning, not so foreign  Dist. 203 exploring ways to teach kids languages - 
From weekly classes to intensive all-day programs, a growing number of DuPage County school districts are finding ways to teach foreign language to elementary students.

Those models may prove extremely helpful as Naperville Unit District 203, one of the region’s largest school systems, studies options for expanding foreign language instruction for its own young students.

While varying resources, schedules and interest levels have dictated the types of programs districts offer, area educators are quick to agree foreign language instruction is key to preparing students to compete globally.

And, they say, it’s never too early start.

“There’s plenty of research to back up that foreign language taught at an earlier age is more beneficial than when taught at a later age,” says Superintendent Diane Cody of Winfield Elementary District 34.

What isn’t always so clear is the best way to provide that instruction.

Two approaches

Naperville is considering two main approaches: teaching foreign language as a distinct subject, or teaching it as one of three types of immersion programs in which students spend half or all of their school day learning other subjects in a foreign language.

District 34 and Hinsdale Elementary District 181 both opt for a traditional foreign language class during the school day.

In Winfield, that means first- through fifth-graders take a mandatory 42-minute Spanish class once a week. While that’s less than in some districts, Cody says the program is getting favorable results.

“Reports we receive back from high school Spanish teachers are very positive of the level of achievement from our students,” she says. “So we believe it’s very effective.”

Foreign language is also mandatory in Hinsdale, but it’s offered only to fifth-graders, who take either Spanish or French for 25 minutes a day four days a week.

“Optimal would be to offer it at a younger age, which we want to look at, but we’re balancing different requirements and programs and subjects we have to offer,” says Warren Shillingburg, assistant superintendent for instruction.

Finding time in an already packed school day is a common challenge for districts, including Naperville’s. Days are already filled by basics such as math and science along with art, music and electives.

Some districts have circumvented the problem by offering language classes before or after school.

The drawbacks, though, are that not all students can attend after-school programs and, in some districts, parents have to pay additional fees.

Bensenville Elementary District 2 has an optional after-school program for third- through fifth-graders that is outsourced to Spanish Quest but funded by the district.

Michael Heggerty, assistant superintendent for instructional services, says 86 students — roughly 13 percent of the pupils at that grade level — participate. It’s worth noting, though, that the district already has a high percentage of Spanish-speaking students.

Bilingual learning

One way to get around the time crunch is to offer an immersion program that involves a partial or full day of learning other subjects in a foreign language. Some districts offer a dual, or two-way, immersion in which native English speakers are in class with students who speak another language.

West Chicago Elementary District 33 is in its sixth year of a dual-language program at Gary Elementary School.

Students in the optional program begin in kindergarten and stay with the same group of students through sixth grade. Roughly half the students are native English speakers while half are Spanish speakers.

For the first few years, 80 percent of a student’s day is spent in Spanish, but by fifth grade, half the day is in each language. Students also still take a literacy component in their native language.

The program has been so popular the school now offers two strands of about 25 students each.

Gloria Trejo, director of second language learning, says dual immersion is much more beneficial than a partial immersion or separate foreign language class.

“This is entirely different than having a Spanish class,” Trejo said. “This is more effective because kids are learning academics in Spanish versus in Spanish class only getting one period of Spanish … and only learning the basics.”

Dist. 203’s efforts

In Naperville’s District 203, a committee has been created to study possible foreign language options and the associated costs and to report back to the school board next month.

The push came from board members Jim Caulfield and Susan Crotty, who both made elementary foreign language part of their 2005 election platforms. Once in office, they asked the district to study the issue as part of its strategic plan.

Jodi Wirt, associate superintendent for instruction, says the committee is trying to keep an open mind and could end up making more than one recommendation.

“We’re hoping somehow the district can find a way to provide all students with a foreign language experience,” she said.

The district surveyed parents last fall and found many support having a foreign language program for younger students.

The largest number of respondents said they prefer having language taught as a class unto itself. Partial immersion finished second in the survey followed by two-way and total immersion programs.

In the survey, Wirt alerted parents that offering language as a separate class likely would require it to be held after school and could require a fee.

Some school board members, however, say they want to find a way to fit foreign language into the school day to ensure all students have access. Caulfield says he envisions it being mandatory.

District 203 once had an elementary foreign language program, which started in 1997. Fourth- and fifth-graders took Spanish twice a week for 20 minutes each time and sixth-graders had a daily language class for 12 weeks as part of an exploratory program.

The program was eliminated in 2002, however, when a financial pinch forced the district to cut more than $493,000 from its budget.

Teachers and administrators have said if the program is resurrected, they’d like it to be more comprehensive.

Ignacio Gamboa, Naperville Central foreign language coordinator, says he notices a difference in students who have taken foreign language before reaching high school. In a perfect world, he would choose an immersion program starting as young as possible the way many other countries teach language.

“If it’s done well and the resources are there, the sky is the limit with the kids,” Gamboa says. “If they are learning content in the target language ... they are internalizing, be it in math, science, history, in the target language.”

ABC7
Illinois House schedules rare joint committee on electric rates - AP
The public outcry over soaring electric rates is headed to the entire Illinois House next week.
House leaders today announced they will have the entire 118-member body meet in a rare joint committee session Tuesday afternoon starting at one p-m.

The House will take testimony on the electric rate increase that went into effect last month, although it will not take any official action then.

A group of House Democrat legislators also today proposed rolling back the rate increases and freezing rates for three years. They say some constituents, especially downstate, are paying much higher increases than anyone expected.

Legislative leaders continue to bicker over how to deal with the higher rates. House Speaker Michael Madigan supports the rate freeze, while Senate President Emil Jones has backed a phase-in of the increases.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE
VERY SAD: Illinois Senate approves stem-cell bill - Ray Long and Rick Pearson
SPRINGFIELD -- Bolstered by last fall's election successes, the Senate's Democratic majority achieved a long-sought ideological victory Friday by giving overwhelming approval to a measure to encourage stem-cell research in Illinois.

The 35-23 vote, sending the highly symbolic and political measure to the House, reflected in part the gains made in the Nov. 7 election by Democrats who embraced the controversial medical research in winning campaigns for four seats previously held by Republicans who opposed the research. A vote more than two years ago on a similar measure fell two votes shy of approval.

Sponsoring Sen. Jeff Schoenberg (D-Evanston) called the issue "one of the most morally compelling challenges" facing the General Assembly. He and Comptroller Dan Hynes, who went to the Senate floor for the vote, have called for the state to put more than $25 million into stem-cell research.

Supporters of the measure acknowledged the practical effect of the legislation was largely to demonstrate that Illinois wanted to attract and keep researchers and grant money in hopes that stem-cell advances could address cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and other debilitating conditions.

The bill would ensure Illinois researchers could work with embryonic stem cells, which can be made into virtually any type of tissue. The cells typically come from early-stage human embryos that are left over from in-vitro fertilization. Such work has drawn opposition from groups opposed to abortion rights that argue research that requires the destruction of human embryos is immoral.

The bill also would outlaw human cloning.

Democratic Sens. Dan Kotowski of Park Ridge and Linda Holmes of Aurora, two of the new lawmakers, were among several senators who offered heart-felt testimony that research could help battle illnesses suffered by friends, relatives and, in some cases, themselves.

"Do we know for sure if stem-cell research will lead to the cure or the elimination of many catastrophic illnesses? No," she said. "We don't know that. But do we owe it to ourselves to find out if it can? Absolutely."

Senators also sent the House a measure that would require convicted sex offenders to register their e-mail and instant messenger names with local authorities. Another bill gaining approval would reinstate a 7 percent cap on Cook County property-tax assessments, though it faces an uncertain future in the House.
 
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
VERY SAD: Senate OKs stem cell research - Dave McKinney
http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/health/270895,CST-NWS-stemcell24.article
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Sen. Kirk Dillard (R-Hinsdale), whose wife suffers from Crohn's disease, said life begins in the womb, not in the laboratory, where embryos are created for in vitro fertilization and are routinely discarded. "They go into the public sewer system. I really believe my maker would want me to use these embryos to sustain and improve human life," said Dillard, who voted for the bill.)
 
SPRINGFIELD -- The Illinois Senate voted to legalize and publicly fund embryonic stem cell research Friday over objections the move will destroy one of the basic building blocks of life.

The stem cell vote highlighted a busy legislative day that also included Senate action to cap real estate assessments in Cook County and to expand a state tax credit for the working poor.

The 35-23 vote on stem cell research marked the first time in three tries that the initiative won Senate backing. It now goes to the House, which has previously passed a similar measure.

"The reason why we need to do this and do this today is because this research holds great promise for life-saving breakthroughs," said Sen. Jeff Schoenberg (D-Evanston), the bill's lead Senate sponsor.

Researchers believe embryonic stem cells have potential to help in the treatment of diabetes, Lou Gehrig's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, stroke, Crohn's disease, Alzheimer's disease, AIDS/HIV and sickle cell anemia, among other things.

But in order to obtain the cells for that research, human embryos are destroyed, which makes the process so controversial among groups that believe life begins at conception.

"Obviously, we all want cures to diseases. The question is, what are we willing to sacrifice to get them? The unique identity of an individual human being disappears for eternity," said Sen. Chris Lauzen (R-Aurora), who voted no.

Gov. Blagojevich used his executive powers to form the Illinois Regenerative Medicine Institute and to award $15 million in state-funded research grants.

Schoenberg's legislation would incorporate the institute and the grant-making process into the state's law books and ban human cloning. No tax dollars were attached to the proposal, but separate legislation later this spring likely will provide more funding.

The successful vote occurred partly on the strength of newly elected suburban Democrats, who favor stem cell research, and it did not break strictly along party lines.

7% cap, $60,000 exemption
Sen. Kirk Dillard (R-Hinsdale), whose wife suffers from Crohn's disease, said life begins in the womb, not in the laboratory, where embryos are created for in vitro fertilization and are routinely discarded.

"They go into the public sewer system. I really believe my maker would want me to use these embryos to sustain and improve human life," said Dillard, who voted for the bill.

In other action, the Senate revived a push to slow soaring property tax bills in Cook County by voting 33-23 to cap assessments at 7 percent. The measure would limit the maximum exemptions for homeowners at $60,000 and now moves to the House.

"This bill provides real savings so families can afford to remain in their homes and preserve the quality and the character of our neighborhoods," said Cook County Assessor James M. Houlihan.

The Senate also voted 56-0 to double -- from $220 to $440 -- the Illinois Earned Income Tax Credit.

 
DES MOINES REGISTER
Include all candidates (including John Cox) - Dave Cooper, Altoona
(THE LETTER: The Feb. 19 story on Republican candidates left John Cox out ("Which Republican Is Right for Iowa's GOP?"). This is how qualified candidates get left out at the beginning. It is the Register's responsibility to include all candidates in your coverage until they have pulled out of the race. Cox is a true conservative who represents many of my positions. I encourage the Register to offer him the same coverage you offer the others.)
 
BLOOMINGTON PANTAGRAPH
OUTSTANDING: Law would force girls to tell family before abortion - Mike Riopell
SPRINGFIELD -- Under a new state proposal, girls under age 18 would have to tell a parent, relative or member of the clergy before having an abortion.

The idea of girls having to tell their parents about abortions has been around the state for years. A 1995 parental notification law required girls to either notify a parent, or explain to a judge why they didn't want to, before having an abortion.

But it was blocked by the courts at the time and its future remains in flux.

Now, a Chicago Democrat wants to change the rules so girls could tell not only parents, but also grandparents, adult siblings or clergy before getting an abortion.

Minors would also have the alternative of seeking medical counseling to get information about either carrying the baby to term or aborting it.

State Rep. John Fritchey's proposal was approved in a House committee Thursday by 6-2 vote. It now heads to the full House for further debate.

He says allowing girls to seek the more nurturing tone of a counselor would be better than a potentially intimidating judge and courtroom.

But Ralph Rivera, spokesman for Illinois Citizens for Life, says that the medical professionals the proposal calls for can be found at abortion clinics. He says that would give teenagers a chance to bypass any kind of notification and get their counseling on site.

''If you want no parental notification, this is the bill to vote for,'' he said.

State Rep. Paul Froehlich, R-Schaumburg, voted ''no'' and said it's odd that a teenager needs parental permission for a relatively gentle procedure like an ear piercing, but not for an abortion.

The legislation is House Bill 317.
 
LAKE COUNTY NEWS-SUN
Two candidates challenge Zion mayor's re-election - A.J. Goldsmith
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Ratliff says that he has been endorsed by Jim Oberweis, a business leader and former Republican candidate for Illinois' governor.)
Two challengers will be on Tuesday's primary election ballot seeking to end the eight-year incumbency of Mayor Lane Harrison.

Both of Harrison's opponents are citing crime as their top issue, while one opponent says senior citizens are bearing the brunt of taxes. For each of them, this election is a first run for public office.

David Ratliff announced his candidacy some six months ago and has been conducting a vigorous campaign. He has been critical of Zion's Police Department and the city's crime rate.

A life-long resident of Lake County who has lived in Zion for a decade, Ratliff is married and the father of three young children. Since his campaign began, he has been a regular attendee at meetings of the Zion City Council. Ratliff is also backing Jack Senter for city commissioner to replace incumbent Jim Taylor.

Ratliff says that he has been endorsed by Jim Oberweis, a business leader and former Republican candidate for Illinois' governor.

Ratliff also opposes the proposal to make the mayor's office a full-time job.

Dennis Barden has lived in Zion since 1992 when he retired after serving 30 years in the Navy achieving the rank of command master chief petty officer. He is a manager for Ace Hardware in Zion. He is married and has three grown children.

Barden is somewhat of a police "junkie", listening to police calls on his scanner.

"People are afraid to leave their homes," he said. "The mayor doesn't know what is going on in Zion. Just listen to the police calls and hear about drugs and gangs. Zion is a joke."

While Barden was stationed in Hawaii in 1982, his eldest daughter was kidnapped and killed in Missouri.

"Here, the mayor hasn't done anything about crime. He doesn't listen to his constituents," Barden charges. The former sailor also is angry about the $5,200 taxes he pays on his three-bedroom ranch home in the city.

Harrison points to the economic progress in Zion, but Barden says the new Wal-Mart at Route 173 and Green Bay Road will "devastate" the downtown area.

Harrison was born in Zion and graduated from Zion-Benton High School. He will soon retire after 35 years as a teacher in Zion public schools. His family came to Zion more than a century ago.

Harrison vigorously refutes the charges of lawlessness in the city, but readily admits "crime is on the rise throughout the country and Zion is no exception."

He points with pride to the police department's arrest rate that has "increased 25 percent over and above the crime rate. We are solving crimes at an increasing rate."

Responding to Barden's charge about high taxes, Harrison agrees that "taxes are too high and seniors deserve a break." But he immediately points out that Zion is only responsible for 14 percent of the real estate tax bill while schools count for 64 percent.

"The city government has reduced or frozen our tax rate for five of the last seven years," the mayor said.

Harrison points with pride to the economic advancements of the city during his two terms in office. New businesses in Zion include Country Inn & Suites, Aldi Foods, Walgreen's, CVS Pharmacy, Wal-Mart, Culvers, Applebees, Cingular Cell Phone, Enterprise Car Rental, Maine Plastics and FedEx.

Harrison and his wife, Sheryl, have three grown daughters and a son who is a major in the U.S. Army.

COURIER NEWS

Carpentersville board hopefuls face decision today  4 contested races: Each one supports Illegal Immigration Relief Act proposal - Ben Lefebvre

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/couriernews/news/271230,3_1_EL24_A1CVILLE_S1.article

(FROM THE ARTICLE: Trustees and some residents have said they find a disturbing pattern in the objections, noting the candidates' support of the Illegal Immigration Relief Act. Neither Brown nor Berreles have appeared at village board hearings. Neither returned phone calls seeking comment. Concern for the law Ibendahl, also an attorney for the Family Taxpayers Network and chairman of the Republican Young Professionals of Illinois, said his work on the objections is "absolutely not" connected to those groups. Instead, he said, his concern was candidates following the letter of the electoral law. "We wouldn't be going through this process right now if these things had been sufficiently filed," Ibendahl said. "People need to follow the law. That's what this is all about. Some of these candidates had some major problems with their signatures." Sigwalt disputes that, however, saying she thinks at least some of the objections were frivolous. "I have one gentlemen who came over to pick up his affidavit because Ibendahl protested how the 't' was crossed in his middle name," she said. "People's signatures change over the years as they age, or they have a stroke or other medical issues. My mother was one of the people they challenged. When she filled out her registration card, she was much younger. She's 84 years old now.")

CARPENTERSVILLE -- The village electoral review board will decide today whether the campaigns of four village trustee candidates are beginning or ending.

The board -- made up of Village President Bill Sarto, Trustee Kay Teeter and Village Clerk Terri Wilde -- will decide whether to dismiss formal objections against the nominating petitions of incumbents Paul Humpfer and Judith Sigwalt and challengers Keith Hinz and Frank Stoneham. The hearing is set for 3 p.m. at village hall.

The four candidates, all seeking village board seats in April's election, are supporters of the now-tabled Illegal Immigration Relief Act, which would define English as the village's official language and allow for fines against business owners or landlords who aid illegal immigrants.

At least two of the candidates sounded confident after they met with members of the electoral board, an attorney for the objectors and a handwriting expert at the county clerk's office on Wednesday for review of the contested signatures on their nominating petitions.

"They said we're OK, though they still have some signatures" under contention, Sigwalt said.

The board cleared 93 of the signatures on Sigwalt's petitions and 98 on Humpfer's, putting them above the 79-signature minimum required to run in Carpentersville.

Keith Hinz may have more cause to worry, however. He said 81 signatures remained on his petition after the check, but 10 of those still are contested.

Frank Stoneham may be out of the race altogether, retaining only 63 valid signatures.

Doug Ibendahl, the Chicago-based attorney representing the two Carpentersville residents who filed the objections to the candidate petitions, still holds protests on some signatures and said he will appeal the board's decisions to clear others.

The candidates said they plan to present affidavits signed by people whose signatures remain under contention.

Ibendahl represents Jesus "Jesse" Berreles and Janet Brown, two Carpentersville residents who formally contested the validity of a combined 200 signatures on the four candidates' nominating petitions Feb. 12.

Trustees and some residents have said they find a disturbing pattern in the objections, noting the candidates' support of the Illegal Immigration Relief Act.

Neither Brown nor Berreles have appeared at village board hearings. Neither returned phone calls seeking comment.

Concern for the law

Ibendahl, also an attorney for the Family Taxpayers Network and chairman of the Republican Young Professionals of Illinois, said his work on the objections is "absolutely not" connected to those groups. Instead, he said, his concern was candidates following the letter of the electoral law.

"We wouldn't be going through this process right now if these things had been sufficiently filed," Ibendahl said. "People need to follow the law. That's what this is all about. Some of these candidates had some major problems with their signatures."

Sigwalt disputes that, however, saying she thinks at least some of the objections were frivolous.

"I have one gentlemen who came over to pick up his affidavit because Ibendahl protested how the 't' was crossed in his middle name," she said. "People's signatures change over the years as they age, or they have a stroke or other medical issues. My mother was one of the people they challenged. When she filled out her registration card, she was much younger. She's 84 years old now."

ILLINOIS FAMILY INSTITUTE
Very Sad: Illinois Senate Passes Embryonic Stem Cell and Cloning Bill
Senators in Springfield vote 35 to 23 to use tax dollars to fund human embryonic stem cell research and cloning. Thirty votes were needed to pass this bill. It now moves on to the House for further debate.

Look at the chart below to see how your state senator voted, or you can also download it by clicking HERE.

ACTION: Please contact your state representative and ask him/her to vote against tax payer funding for embryonic stem cell research. The bill reference number is HB 138. The switchboard phone number in Springfield is 217-782-2000.

Click HERE to look up your elected officials or call the IFI office at 630-790-8370.
 
Homosexual So-Called "Marriage" Bill Introduced - David E. Smith
Illinois State Representative Greg Harris (D-Chicago), has introduced a bill is Springfield (HB 1615) to legalize homosexual so-called "marriage" in our state.

ACTION: Please call your state representative NOW and urge him or her to VOTE NO on HB 1615. Springfield needs to hear from you right away. The switchboard phone number in Springfield is 217-782-2000.

Click HERE to look up your elected officials or call the IFI office at 630-790-8370.

MORE ACTION: If you believe in keeping marriage from being radically redefined and devolving into something it is not, please send your most generous contribution to Illinois Family Institute today by clicking HERE.

Background
Well, we could say "we told you so...", but if you've been reading our emails over the past few years, you know that the homosexual agenda is alive and well in Illinois.

This is a wake-up call like no other. While the Boards of Elections in Chicago and Cook County successfully derailed our Protect Marriage Illinois petition drive last year, Illinois citizens have not surrender the battle for marriage to the tiny but vocal minority on the Left.

Even in the light of the recent disheartening elections, I do not believe there is enough support in the Illinois General Assembly to pass a bill legalizing homosexual so-called "marriage." Yet I concede that the challenges we face on the pro-marriage and pro-family front are great.

Make no mistake; the battle lines have been clearly drawn. The ACLU, Lambda Legal, and the Gay and Lesbian lobby here in Illinois will work hard to achieve their goal of homosexual so-called "marriage."
 
"Lambda Legal's Marriage Project is committed to winning the right to marry for same-sex couples." - Lambda Legal's website.
 
"State capitols continue to be the epicenters in the quest for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender equality and we will continue to work with our allies to support legislation that moves our goal of equality forward." - Human Rights Campaign President Joe Solmonese
 
These are the telling words from homosexual "marriage" supporters. And it's echoed by thousands more. This is the battle -- the battle for marriage!

While Rep. Harris, the only openly "gay" lawmaker in Springfield, titled his homosexual "marriage" bill the "Religious Freedom and Marriage Fairness Act" in an attempt to try and diffuse the concerns of clergy and religious leader, it will not fool the faith-based community.

Moreover, the evidence we have from Massachusetts proves that legal homosexual "marriage" leads to increased religious persecution and discrimination against faith-based institutions that are morally opposed to homosexual behavior.

IFI will continue to work with pastors, congregations, and citizens-- on the phones, through email and letters, in the halls of the State Capital in Springfield -- wherever the Lord leads us in this battle to protect marriage -- we will be there. And you can stand with us, too.

This is critical. In order to preserve one-man, one-woman marriage -- God ordained -- as the highest social good for society and for our children -- the Illinois General Assembly must pass an amendment preserving marriage in Illinois.

Your secure online donation today will enable us to dig our heels in and protect marriage in the State of Illinois. We will not back down. We will not rest. But we need your contribution to work against this attack on the family.

If liberal lawmakers and homosexual activists have their way in Illinois, the consequences to family as we know it will be devastating. We will not back down now... we cannot.
 
ILLINOIS REVIEW
Two life votes reveal legislators' Belloch and Froehlich mettle - Fran Eaton
Yesterday in the Illinois House Human Services committee, only two Republicans stood firm in a hostile environment, affirming the value of preborn humans -- State Rep. Patti Bellock (R-Hinsdale) and State Rep. Paul Froehlich (R-Schaumburg).  They should be congratulated.

In an overwhelming 6 to 2 vote, State Rep. John Fritchey successfully passed HB 317, which would remove the rights of parents to know their minor daughters were undergoing an abortion.  While Illinois' 1995 parental notification law is still not in effect, Fritchey is pre-empting parental involvement by making it possible for grandparents, adult siblings, a clery member or even a counselor at a Planned Parenthood abortion-providing clinic to suffice as a notification recipient.   

More to come on this. . .

In addition yesterday, State Rep. Tom Cross (R-Plainfield) passionately pled with Human Services to push his legislation coordinating with State Senator Jeff Schoenberg's SB 004, which would formalize Governor Blagojevich's 2005 embryonic stem cell research executive order.  In testimony, Northwestern University researcher Dr. David Kessler explained the need for embryos to be used in experimentation for the greater good of someday curing juvenile diabetes, spinal cord injuries, Parkinson's and heart diseases. 

Kessler also admitted to the committee that embryonic experimentation would permit "therapeutic" cloning, a research technique that creates a clone, but prevents him or her from being implanted in a woman's body to grow.  Rep. Bellock said she could not support the measure because it allowed for cloning.  She and Rep. Froehlich were the only two "no" committee votes on Cross' bill.  Pro-life activists were disappointed that their freshman Republican State Rep Sandy Cole (R) declared her pro-choice position by supporting the bill along with Republican colleague Elizabeth Coulson, along with all the Democrats.  Cole is replacing former State Rep. Bob Churchill, who was a solid pro-life vote when in the legislature. 

Cross said he expects to call his bill on the House floor next week.

Both Bellock and Froehlich stood by traditional family values and moral absolutes in their questions and in their votes.  They are to be congratulated and encouraged.

ILLINOIS POLICY INSTITUTE
The Really Gross 'Gross Receipts Tax' - Greg Blankenship
After the Democratic sweep last Fall, Springfield is chomping at the bit to hike taxes.  As stated in a recent Springfield State Journal-Register editorial, “…seldom have we seen such giant demands for new taxes and spending so early.” 

Headquartered at the scene of the crime, the Journal-Register’s editorial board warning is ominous, indeed.  In January, that same paper treated us to the news that while our Governor and two legislative leaders couldn’t agree on what taxes to hike or why they wanted to hike taxes; they did all agree that they wanted to hike taxes.

Governor Blagojevich (D-Chicago) has ruled out an income or sales tax hike but is open to closing “business loopholes,” reportedly to fund universal health care.  

Senate President Emil Jones (D-Chicago) wants to hike income taxes, but doesn’t want to hike sales taxes because they disproportionately fall on the poor.  Jones wants more education spending with none of those silly strings of accountability and improved student achievement attached. 

And there is House Speaker Michael Madigan (D-Chicago), who won’t say what he wants to hike.  But he does say he wants to shore up the state’s finances.  That may sound frugal to some, but he means to shore up state finances by undermining yours.

While that sounds bad, it actually gets worse.  Inside Springfield, one new compromise being discussed is a Gross Receipts Tax (GRT).  Estimates range that the tax could sap $13 billion from the state economy. 

Very simply stated, a GRT is a tax on the privilege of doing business.  It is similar to a sales tax in that it is paid every time a transaction takes place, but it is levied on the seller rather than the consumer.  It applies to services – such as legal, barber shops, accountants and doctors – so it is a way of getting around the unpopular step of expanding sales taxes to services.  Moreover, it is applied to every level in the chain of production.

Proponents of the tax argue that it is a small tax and that it is “broad based.”  They hold the belief that if government takes a little of everything that somehow it won’t add up to a lot. 

Yet, two new reports by the Rio Grande Foundation in New Mexico and Tax Foundation in Washington highlight why a GRT is a truly ‘gross’ idea.

 In its study of the history and performance of the GRT, the Tax Foundation found that the tax is hidden, unfair, and overly-complicated.   Furthermore, the GRT is no more stable than any other tax. So, revenue during a recession will suffer just as income and sales taxes suffer.  Less economic activity means fewer transactions to tax and that means lower revenues.

They also found that the tax favors some businesses over others harming competitiveness and distorting economic incentives.  For example, businesses such as a Caterpillar or other manufacturer that uses outside suppliers will be at a competitive disadvantage to vertically integrated companies who manufacture their own component parts.  Suppliers from out of state will have an advantage over in-state suppliers because they won’t be subject to the tax.  The GRT is so bad that Ohio had to modify their GRT before the tax even went in to effect to head of a disaster for that state’s manufacturers.

Finally, there is “tax pyramiding.”  Tax pyramiding occurs when a product is taxed multiple times in the chain of production.  Gross receipts taxes paid compound in a hurry, and add to the costs of production.  Those costs are passed onto the consumer, who often ends up paying more for gross receipts taxes than for the product itself.  This happens millions of times a day in Washington State.  As the Tax Foundation study noted, “The total base of the Washington State Business and Occupation tax, the most significant gross receipts tax remaining in the United States, was $474,813.8 million in calendar year 2005.  Washington gross state product in that year was only $268,502 million.” 

No matter how you cut it, $13 billion out of the Illinois economy is $13 billion out of the Illinois economy.  Springfield can try and hide the cost of the tax but the bottom line is that if this monstrosity is foisted on the people of Illinois, there will job losses with concomitant price hikes on every good and service in Illinois.  There is no getting around that fact.

where to buy abortion pill http://mc.kbu.jp/doc/announce/page/buy-abortion-pill.aspx buy abortion pill

buy the abortion pill online where can you buy the abortion pill abortion pills online

buy the abortion pill online

an abortion pill where can i buy abortion pills
where can i buy abortion pills abortion pill abortion pill
abortion pill buy online buy abortion pill abortion pill
how to order the abortion pill online on line abortion pill buy the abortion pill online
online purchase abortion pill abortion pill on line abortion pill
where can you buy the abortion pill cytotec abortion abortion pill buy online
where can you buy the abortion pill abortion pill buy abortion pill online
medical abortion pill online abortion pill where can you buy the abortion pill
Reply | Send to a Friend
 
March 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Mar-2007
March 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Mar-2007
March 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Mar-2007
March 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Mar-2007
March 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Mar-2007
March 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Mar-2007
March 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips - Text Only - 1 8-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips - Text Only - 2 8-Mar-2007
March 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Mar-2007
March 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Mar-2007
March 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Mar-2007
March 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Mar-2007
March 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Mar-2007
March 3, 2007 News Clps 3-Mar-2007
March 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Mar-2007
March 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Mar-2007
February 28, 2007 News Clips 28-Feb-2007
February 27, 2007 News Clips 27-Feb-2007
February 26, 2007 News Clips 26-Feb-2007
February 25, 2007 News Clips 25-Feb-2007
February 24, 2007 News Clips 24-Feb-2007
February 23, 2007 News Clips 23-Feb-2007
February 22, 2007 News Clips 22-Feb-2007
February 21, 2007 News Clips 21-Feb-2007
February 20, 2007 News Clips 20-Feb-2007
February 19, 2007 News Clips 19-Feb-2007
February 18, 2007 News Clips 18-Feb-2007
February 17, 2007 News Clips 17-Feb-2007
February 16, 2007 News Clips 16-Feb-2007
February 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Feb-2007
February 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Feb-2007
February 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Feb-2007
February 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Feb-2007
February 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Feb-2007
February 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Feb-2007
February 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Feb-2007
February 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Feb-2007
February 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Feb-2007
February 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Feb-2007
February 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Feb-2007
February 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Feb-2007
Februray 3, 2007 News Clips 3-Feb-2007
February 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Feb-2007
February 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Feb-2007
January 31, 2007 News Clips 31-Jan-2007
January 30, 2007 News Clips 30-Jan-2007
January 29, 2007 News Clips 29-Jan-2007
January 28, 2007 News Clips 28-Jan-2007
January 27, 2007 News Clips 27-Jan-2007
January 26, 2007 News Clips 26-Jan-2007
January 25, 2007 News Clips 25-Jan-2007
January 24, 2007 News Clips 24-Jan-2007
January 23, 2007 News Clips 23-Jan-2007
January 22, 2007 News Clips 22-Jan-2007
January 21, 2007 News Clips 21-Jan-2007
January 20, 2007 News Clips 20-Jan-2007
January 19, 2007 News Clips 19-Jan-2007
January 18, 2007 News Clips 18-Jan-2007
January 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Jan-2007
January 16, 2007 News Clips 16-Jan-2007
January 15, 2007 News Clips 15-Jan-2007
January 14, 2007 News Clips 14-Jan-2007
January 13, 2007 News Clips 13-Jan-2007
January 12, 2007 News Clips 12-Jan-2007
January 11, 2007 News Clips 11-Jan-2007
January 10, 2007 News Clips 10-Jan-2007
January 9, 2007 News Clips 9-Jan-2007
January 8, 2007 News Clips 8-Jan-2007
January 7, 2007 News Clips 7-Jan-2007
January 6, 2007 News Clips 6-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips - Text 1 5-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips - Text 2 5-Jan-2007
January 5, 2007 News Clips 5-Jan-2007
January 4, 2007 News Clips 4-Jan-2007
January 3, 2007 News Clips 3-Jan-2007
January 2, 2007 News Clips 2-Jan-2007
January 1, 2007 News Clips 1-Jan-2007
December 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Dec-2006
December 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Dec-2006
December 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Dec-2006
December 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Dec-2006
December 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Dec-2006
December 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Dec-2006
December 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Dec-2006
December 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Dec-2006
December 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Dec-2006
December 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Dec-2006
December 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Dec-2006
December 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Dec-2006
December 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Dec-2006
December 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Dec-2006
December 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Dec-2006
December 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Dec-2006
December 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Dec-2006
December 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Dec-2006
December 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Dec-2006
December 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Dec-2006
December 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Dec-2006
December 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Dec-2006
December 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Dec-2006
December 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Dec-2006
December 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Dec-2006
December 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Dec-2006
December 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Dec-2006
December 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Dec-2006
December 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Dec-2006
December 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Dec-2006
December 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Dec-2006
November 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Nov-2006
November 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Nov-2006
November 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Nov-2006
November 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Nov-2006
November 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Nov-2006
November 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Nov-2006
November 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Nov-2006
November 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Nov-2006
November 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Nov-2006
November 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Nov-2006
November 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Nov-2006
November 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Nov-2006
November 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Nov-2006
November 17, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Nov-2006
November 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Nov-2006
November 16, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Nov-2006
November 16, 2006 News Clips 17-Nov-2006
November 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Nov-2006
November 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Nov-2006
November 14, 2006 News Clips - Text 14-Nov-2006
November 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Nov-2006
November 13, 2006 News Clips - Text 13-Nov-2006
November 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Nov-2006
November 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 12-Nov-2006
November 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Nov-2006
November 11, 2006 News Clips - Text 11-Nov-2006
November 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Nov-2006
November 10, 2006 News Clips - Text 10-Nov-2006
November 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 9-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 9-Nov-2006
November 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 8-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 8-Nov-2006
November 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Nov-2006
November 7, 2006 News Clips - Text 7-Nov-2006
November 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Nov-2006
November 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 6-Nov-2006
November 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Nov-2006
November 5, 2006 News Clips - Text 5-Nov-2006
November 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Nov-2006
November 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 4-Nov-2006
November 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 3-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 3-Nov-2006
November 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 2-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 2-Nov-2006
November 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Nov-2006
November 1, 2006 News Clips - Text 1-Nov-2006
November 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Nov-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 31-Oct-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 31-Oct-2006
October 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Oct-2006
October 30, 2006 News Clips - Text 30-Oct-2006
October 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 29-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 29-Oct-2006
October 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Oct-2006
October 28, 2006 News Clips - Text 28-Oct-2006
October 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 27-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 27-Oct-2006
October 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clip - Text 1 26-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 26-Oct-2006
October 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Oct-2006
October 25, @006 News Clips - Text 25-Oct-2006
October 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips -Text 1 24-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 24-Oct-2006
October 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Oct-2006
October 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 23-Oct-2006
October 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 22-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 22-Oct-2006
October 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Oct-2006
October 21, 2006 News Clips - Text 21-Oct-2006
October 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Oct-2006
October 20, 2006 News Clips - Text 20-Oct-2006
October 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Oct-2006
October 19, 2006 News Clips - Text 19-Oct-2006
October 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 18-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 18-Oct-2006
October 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Oct-2006
October 17, 2006 News Clips - Text 17-Oct-2006
October 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Oct-2006
October 16, 2006 News Clips - Text 16-Oct-2006
October 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Oct-2006
October 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Oct-2006
October 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Oct-2006
October 14, 2006 News Clips - Text 14-Oct-2006
October 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Oct-2006
October 13, 2006 News Clips - Text (1 of 2) 13-Oct-2006
October 13, 2006 News Clips (1 of 2) 13-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 12-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 12-Oct-2006
October 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Oct-2006
October 11, 2006 News Clips - Text 11-Oct-2006
October 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Oct-2006
October 10, 2006 News Clips - Text 10-Oct-2006
October 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Oct-2006
October 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 8-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 8-Oct-2006
October 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Oct-2006
October 7, 2006 News Clips - Text 7-Oct-2006
October 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 6-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 6-Oct-2006
October 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 1 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 2 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 3 5-Oct-2006
October 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips Text 1 4-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 4-Oct-2006
October 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clip - Text -1 3-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 3-Oct-2006
October 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Oct-2006
October 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Oct-2006
October 1, 2006 News Clips - Text 1-Oct-2006
October 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Oct-2006
September 30, 2006 News Clips - Text 30-Sep-2006
September 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Sep-2006
September 29, 2006 News Clips - Text 29-Sep-2006
September 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Sep-2006
September 28, 2006 News Clips - Text 28-Sep-2006
September 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Sep-2006
September 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Sep-2006
September 26, 2006 News Clips - Text 26-Sep-2006
September 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Sep-2006
September 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Sep-2006
September 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Sep-2006
September 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Sep-2006
September 22, 2006 News Clips - Text 22-Sep-2006
September 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Sep-2006
September 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Sep-2006
September 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Sep-2006
September 19, 2006 News Clips - Text 19-Sep-2006
September 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Sep-2006
September 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Sep-2006
September 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Sep-2006
September 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Sep-2006
September 15, 2006 News Clips - Text 15-Sep-2006
September 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Sep-2006
September 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Sep-2006
September 13, 2006 News Clips - text 13-Sep-2006
September 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Sep-2006
September 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Sep-2006
September 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Sep-2006
September 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Sep-2006
September 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Sep-2006
September 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-Sep-2006
September 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Sep-2006
September 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Sep-2006
September 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Sep-2006
September 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Sep-2006
September 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Sep-2006
September 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Sep-2006
September 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Sep-2006
September 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Sep-2006
August 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Aug-2006
August 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Aug-2006
August 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Aug-2006
August 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Aug-2006
August 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Aug-2006
August 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Aug-2006
August 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Aug-2006
August 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Aug-2006
August 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Aug-2006
August 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Aug-2006
August 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Aug-2006
August 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Aug-2006
August 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Aug-2006
August 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Aug-2006
August 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Aug-2006
August 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Aug-2006
August 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Aug-2006
August 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Aug-2006
August 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Aug-2006
August 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Aug-2006
August 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Aug-2006
August 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Aug-2006
August 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Aug-2006
August 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Aug-2006
August 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Aug-2006
August 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Aug-2006
August 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Aug-2006
August 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Aug-2006
August 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Aug-2006
August 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Aug-2006
August 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Aug-2006
July 31, 2006 News Clips 31-July-2006
July 30, 2006 News Clips 30-July-2006
July 29, 2006 News Clips 29-July-2006
July 28, 2006 News Clips 28-July-2006
July 27, 2006 News Clips 27-July-2006
July 26, 2006 News Clips 26-July-2006
July 25, 2006 News Clips 25-July-2006
July 24, 2006 News Clips 24-July-2006
July 23, 2006 News Clips 23-July-2006
July 22, 2006 News Clips 22-July-2006
July 21, 2006 News Clips 21-July-2006
July 20, 2006 News Clips 20-July-2006
July 19, 2006 News Clips 19-July-2006
July 18, 2006 News Clips 18-July-2006
July 17, 2006 News Clips 17-July-2006
July 16, 2006 News Clips 16-July-2006
July 15, 2006 News Clips 15-July-2006
July 14, 2006 News Clip - Text 14-July-2006
July 14, 2006 News Clips 14-July-2006
July 13, 2006 News Clips 13-July-2006
July 12, 2006 News Clips 12-July-2006
July 11, 2006 News Clips 11-July-2006
July 10, 2006 News Clips 10-July-2006
July 9, 2006 News Clips 9-July-2006
July 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-July-2006
July 8, 2006 News Clips 8-July-2006
July 7, 2006 News Clips 7-July-2006
July 6, 2006 News Clips 6-July-2006
July 5, 2006 News Clips 5-July-2006
July 4, 2006 News Clips 4-July-2006
July 3, 2006 News Clips 3-July-2006
July 2, 2006 News Clips 2-July-2006
July 1, 2006 News Clips 1-July-2006
June 30, 2006 News Clips 30-June-2006
June 29, 2006 News Clips 29-June-2006
June 28, 2006 News Clips 28-June-2006
June 27, 2006 News Clips 27-June-2006
June 26, 2006 News Clips 26-June-2006
June 25, 2006 News Clips 25-June-2006
June 24, 2006 News Clips 24-June-2006
June 23, 2006 News Clips 23-June-2006
June 22, 2006 News Clips 22-June-2006
June 21, 2006 News Clips 21-June-2006
June 20, 2006 News Clips 20-June-2006
June 19, 2006 News Clips 19-June-2006
June 18, 2006 News Clips 18-June-2006
June 17, 2006 News Clips 17-June-2006
June 16, 2006 News Clips 16-June-2006
June 15, 2006 News Clips 15-June-2006
June 14, 2006 News Clips 14-June-2006
June 13, 2006 News Clips 13-June-2006
June 12, 2006 News Clips 12-June-2006
June 11, 2006 News Clips 11-June-2006
June 10, 2006 News Clips 10-June-2006
June 9, 2006 News Clips 9-June-2006
June 8, 2006 News Clips 8-June-2006
June 7, 2006 News Clips 7-June-2006
June 6, 2006 News Clips 6-June-2006
June 5, 2006 News Clips 5-June-2006
June 4, 2006 News Clips 4-June-2006
June 3, 2006 News Clips 3-June-2006
June 2, 2006 News Clips 2-June-2006
June 1, 2006 News Clips 1-June-2006
May 31, 2006 News Clips 31-May-2006
May 30, 2006 News Clips 30-May-2006
May 29, 2006 News Clips 29-May-2006
May 28, 2006 News Clips 28-May-2006
May 27, 2006 News Clips 27-May-2006
May 26, 2006 News Clips 26-May-2006
May 25, 2006 News Clips 25-May-2006
May 24, 2006 News Clips 24-May-2006
May 23, 2006 News Clips 23-May-2006
May 22, 2006 News Clips 22-May-2006
May 21, 2006 News Clips 21-May-2006
May 20, 2006 News Clips 20-May-2006
May 19, 2006 News Clips 19-May-2006
May 18, 2006 News Clips 18-May-2006
May 17, 2006 News Clips 17-May-2006
May 16, 2006 News Clips 16-May-2006
May 15, 2006 News Clips 15-May-2006
May 14, 2006 News Clips 14-May-2006
May 13, 2006 News Clips 13-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips Text 1 12-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips Text 2 12-May-2006
May 12, 2006 News Clips 12-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 1 11-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 2 11-May-2006
May 11, 2006 News Clips 11-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 1 10-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 2 10-May-2006
May 10, 2006 News Clips 10-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips -Text 1 9-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 9-May-2006
May 9, 2006 News Clips 9-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips - Text 8-May-2006
May 8, 2006 News Clips 8-May-2006
May 7, 2006 News Clips 7-May-2006
May 6, 2006 News Clips 6-May-2006
May 5, 2006 News Clips 5-May-2006
May 4, 2006 News Clips - Text 4-May-2006
May 4, 2006 News Clips 4-May-2006
May 3, 2006 News Clips 3-May-2006
May 2, 2006 News Clips 2-May-2006
May 1, 2006 News Clips 1-May-2006
April 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Apr-2006
April 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Apr-2006
April 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Apr-2006
April 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Apr-2006
April 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips Text 1 25-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips Text 2 25-Apr-2006
April 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Apr-2006
April 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Apr-2006
April 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Apr-2006
April 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Apr-2006
April 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Apr-2006
April 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Apr-2006
April 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Apr-2006
April 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Apr-2006
April 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Apr-2006
April 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Apr-2006
April 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Apr-2006
April 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Apr-2006
April 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Apr-2006
April 12, 2006 News Clips - Text 12-Apr-2006
April 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Apr-2006
April 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Apr-2006
April 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Apr-2006
April 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Apr-2006
April 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Apr-2006
April 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Apr-2006
April 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Apr-2006
April 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Apr-2006
April 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Apr-2006
April 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Apr-2006
April 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Apr-2006
April 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Apr-2006
March 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Mar-2006
March 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Mar-2006
March 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Mar-2006
March 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Mar-2006
March 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Mar-2006
March 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Mar-2006
March 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Mar-2006
March 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 23-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 23-Mar-2006
March 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Mar-2006
March 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Mar-2006
March 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Mar-2006
March 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Mar-2006
March 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Mar-2006
March 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Mar-2006
March 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Mar-2006
March 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Mar-2006
March 15, 2006 news Clips 15-Mar-2006
March 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Mar-2006
March 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips - 2 12-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips -1 12-Mar-2006
March 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Mar-2006
March 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Mar-2006
March 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Mar-2006
March 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Mar-2006
March 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Mar-2006
March 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 2 6-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips - Text 1 6-Mar-2006
March 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Mar-2006
March 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Mar-2006
March 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Mar-2006
March 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Mar-2006
March 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Mar-2006
March 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Mar-2006
February 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Feb-2006
February 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Feb-2006
February 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Feb-2006
February 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Feb-2006
February 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Feb-2006
February 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Feb-2006
February 22, 2006 News Clips 22-Feb-2006
February 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Feb-2006
February 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Feb-2006
February 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Feb-2006
February 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Feb-2006
February 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Feb-2006
February 16, 2006 News clips 16-Feb-2006
February 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Feb-2006
February 14, 2006 News Clips (TEXT) 14-Feb-2006
February 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Feb-2006
February 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Feb-2006
February 12, 2006 News Clips 12-Feb-2006
February 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Feb-2006
February 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Feb-2006
February 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Feb-2006
February 8, 2006 News Clips 8-Feb-2006
February 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Feb-2006
February 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Feb-2006
February 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Feb-2006
February 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Feb-2006
February 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Feb-2006
February 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Feb-2006
February 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Feb-2006
January 31, 2006 News Clips 31-Jan-2006
January 30, 2006 News Clips 30-Jan-2006
January 29, 2006 News Clips 29-Jan-2006
January 28, 2006 News Clips 28-Jan-2006
January 27, 2006 News Clips 27-Jan-2006
January 26, 2006 News Clips 26-Jan-2006
January 25, 2006 News Clips 25-Jan-2006
January 24, 2006 News Clips 24-Jan-2006
January 23, 2006 News Clips 23-Jan-2006
January 22, 2006 news Clips 22-Jan-2006
January 21, 2006 News Clips 21-Jan-2006
January 20, 2006 News Clips 20-Jan-2006
January 19, 2006 News Clips 19-Jan-2006
January 18, 2006 News Clips 18-Jan-2006
January 17, 2006 News Clips 17-Jan-2006
January 16, 2006 News Clips 16-Jan-2006
January 15, 2006 News Clips 15-Jan-2006
January 14, 2006 News Clips 14-Jan-2006
January 13, 2006 News Clips 13-Jan-2006
January 12, 2006 News clips 12-Jan-2006
January 11, 2006 News Clips 11-Jan-2006
January 10, 2006 News Clips 10-Jan-2006
January 9, 2006 News Clips 9-Jan-2006
January 8, 2006 News Chips 8-Jan-2006
January 7, 2006 News Clips 7-Jan-2006
January 6, 2006 News Clips 6-Jan-2006
January 5, 2006 News Clips 5-Jan-2006
January 4, 2006 News Clips 4-Jan-2006
January 3, 2006 News Clips 3-Jan-2006
January 2, 2006 News Clips 2-Jan-2006
January 1, 2006 News Clips 1-Jan-2006
December 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Dec-2005
December 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Dec-2005
December 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Dec-2005
December 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Dec-2005
December 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Dec-2005
December 26, 2005 News Clips (Text) 26-Dec-2005
December 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Dec-2005
December 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Dec-2005
December 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Dec-2005
December 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Dec-2005
December 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Dec-2005
December 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Dec-2005
December 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Dec-2005
December 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Dec-2005
December 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Dec-2005
December 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Dec-2005
December 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Dec-2005
December 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Dec-2005
December 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Dec-2005
December 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Dec-2005
December 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Dec-2005
December 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Dec-2005
December 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Dec-2005
December 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Dec-2005
December 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Dec-2005
December 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Dec-2005
December 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Dec-2005
December 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Dec-2005
December 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Dec-2005
December 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Dec-2005
December 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Dec-2005
December 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Dec-2005
November 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Nov-2005
November 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Nov-2005
November 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Nov-2005
November 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Nov-2005
November 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Nov-2005
November 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Nov-2005
November 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Nov-2005
November 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Nov-2005
November 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Nov-2005
November 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Nov-2005
November 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Nov-2005
November 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Nov-2005
November 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Nov-2005
November 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Nov-2005
November 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Nov-2005
November 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Nov-2005
November 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Nov-2005
November 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Nov-2005
November 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Nov-2005
November 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Nov-2005
November 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Nov-2005
November 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Nov-2005
November 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Nov-2005
November 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Nov-2005
November 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Nov-2005
November 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Nov-2005
November 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Nov-2005
November 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Nov-2005
November 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Nov-2005
November 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Nov-2005
October 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Oct-2005
October 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Oct-2005
October 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Oct-2005
October 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Oct-2005
October 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Oct-2005
October 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Oct-2005
October 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Oct-2005
October 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Oct-2005
October 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Oct-2005
October 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Oct-2005
October 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Oct-2005
October 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Oct-2005
October 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Oct-2005
October 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Oct-2005
October 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Oct-2005
October 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Oct-2005
October 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Oct-2005
October 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Oct-2005
October 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Oct-2005
October 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Oct-2005
October 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Oct-2005
October 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Oct-2005
October 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Oct-2005
October 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Oct-2005
October 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Oct-2005
October 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Oct-2005
October 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Oct-2005
October 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Oct-2005
October 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Oct-2005
October 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Oct-2005
October 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Oct-2005
September 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Sep-2005
September 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Sep-2005
September 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Sep-2005
September 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Sep-2005
September 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Sep-2005
September 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Sep-2005
September 24. 2005 News Clips 24-Sep-2005
September 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Sep-2005
September 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Sep-2005
September 21, 2005 News Clips 21-Sep-2005
September 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Sep-2005
September 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Sep-2005
September 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Sep-2005
September 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Sep-2005
September 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Sep-2005
September 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Sep-2005
September 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Sep-2005
September 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Sep-2005
September 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Sep-2005
September 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Sep-2005
September 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Sep-2005
September 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Sep-2005
September 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Sep-2005
September 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Sep-2005
September 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Sep-2005
September 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Sep-2005
September 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Sep-2005
September 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Sep-2005
September 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Sep-2005
September 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Sep-2005
August 31, 2005 News Clips 31-Aug-2005
August 30, 2005 News Clips 30-Aug-2005
August 29, 2005 News Clips 29-Aug-2005
August 28, 2005 News Clips 28-Aug-2005
August 27, 2005 News Clips 27-Aug-2005
August 26, 2005 News Clips 26-Aug-2005
August 25, 2005 News Clips 25-Aug-2005
August 24, 2005 News Clips 24-Aug-2005
August 23, 2005 News Clips 23-Aug-2005
August 22, 2005 News Clips 22-Aug-2005
August 21, 2005 News Clips - Part 1 21-Aug-2005
August 20, 2005 News Clips 20-Aug-2005
August 19, 2005 News Clips 19-Aug-2005
August 18, 2005 News Clips 18-Aug-2005
August 17, 2005 News Clips 17-Aug-2005
August 16, 2005 News Clips 16-Aug-2005
August 15, 2005 News Clips 15-Aug-2005
August 14, 2005 News Clips 14-Aug-2005
August 13, 2005 News Clips 13-Aug-2005
August 12, 2005 News Clips 12-Aug-2005
August 11, 2005 News Clips 11-Aug-2005
August 10, 2005 News Clips 10-Aug-2005
August 9, 2005 News Clips 9-Aug-2005
August 8, 2005 News Clips 8-Aug-2005
August 7, 2005 News Clips 7-Aug-2005
August 6, 2005 News Clips 6-Aug-2005
August 5, 2005 News Clips 5-Aug-2005
August 4, 2005 News Clips 4-Aug-2005
August 3, 2005 News Clips 3-Aug-2005
August 2, 2005 News Clips 2-Aug-2005
August 1, 2005 News Clips 1-Aug-2005
July 31, 2005 News Clips 31-July-2005
July 30, 2005 News Clips 30-July-2005
July 29, 2005 News Clips 29-July-2005
July 28, 2005 News Clips 28-July-2005
July 27, 2005 News Clips 27-July-2005
July 26, 2005 News Clips 26-July-2005
July 25, 2005 News Clips 25-July-2005
July 24, 2005 News Clips 24-July-2005
July 23, 2005 News Clips 23-July-2005
July 22, 2005 News Clips 22-July-2005
July 21, 2005 News Clips 21-July-2005
July 20, 2005 News Clips 20-July-2005
July 19, 2005 News Clips 19-July-2005
July 18, 2005 News Clips 18-July-2005
July 17, 2005 News Clips 17-July-2005
July 16, 2005 News Clips 16-July-2005
July 15, 2005 News Clips 15-July-2005
July 14, 2005 News Clips 14-July-2005
July 13, 2005 News Clips 13-July-2005
July 12, 2005 News Clips 12-July-2005
July 11, 2005 News Clips 11-July-2005
July 10, 2005 News Clips 10-July-2005
July 9, 2005 News Clips 9-July-2005
July 8, 2005 News Clips 8-July-2005
July 7, 2005 News Clips 7-July-2005
July 6, 2005 News Clips 6-July-2005
 


 

Paid for by David John Diersen