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We Can Get The Sun Shining On New York State's Poor Business Climate Once Again

When it rains – it pours. But, we can always take solace in knowing the sun will shine again. Even though several organizations like the Tax Foundation, Chief Executive Magazine, the American Legislative Exchange Council and MSNBC have ranked New York as a bad place to start a business, we should not throw in the towel just yet. New York is home to some of the hardest-working business owners, the best and brightest minds, first-rate educational institutions and a populace famous for its grit and persistence. After all, small businesses are the backbone of New York State’s economy; 98 percent of all businesses in New York are small businesses. ALBANY’S ‘BAD FOR BUSINESS’ MINDSET NEEDS COMPREHENSIVE REFORM As a former CEO and business leader I know small business, manufacturing and other key components of New York’s economy are being hammered, and if New Yorkers are ever going to enjoy the full potential of our great state, the folks in Albany need to make serious efforts to end the government approach of “Tax, Fine, Harass” in dealing with businesses. I also know we have the capacity to make the necessary and significant changes. Our Conference has proposed some real solutions that can get New York back on track. For far too many job creators, over-regulation and over-taxation have become an expected and ingrained reality. Albany must work to change New York’s ‘anti-business’ reputation by: • Eliminating the job-killing corporate franchise tax and personal income tax on manufacturers (A.4568, Kolb); • Eliminating the Wage Theft Prevention Act’s annual notice requirement – a costly and unnecessary mandate that cuts into businesses bottom lines and inhibits job-creation (A.2482, Gabryszak); • Repealing the onerous “Energy Tax,” the 18-a utility assessment – a charge on utility companies that gets passed on to families and businesses (A.382-A, Hawley); • Providing comprehensive mandate relief to help drive down property taxes (A.1570, Kolb and A.4972, Kolb); • Establishing the Division of Regulatory Review & Economic Growth (D-RREG) to review and make binding recommendations for the elimination of burdensome regulations (A. 5044, Kolb); and • Maintaining our commitment to end the employment interest surcharge that is a burden on every New York business. NOT JUST A CHANGE OF LAW, BUT A CHANGE OF MIND If we are ever going to bring home a better report card and offer families and businesses a better environment in which to prosper, there will need to be some fundamental changes in the way the state operates. When Albany requires something that costs money, Albany needs to pay for it. This might seem like common sense, but far too often those costs are passed down to municipalities and small businesses. It’s bad policy and it needs to stop. And, if we truly want to be open for business, we have to make sure each and every store owner, gun maker, chip-fab manufacturer and mom-and-pop deli has a real chance to succeed. Only then will New York be able to see the sun shine on the Empire State once again. What do you think? I want to hear from you. Send me your feedback, suggestions and ideas regarding this or any other issue facing New York State. You can always contact my district office at (315) 781-2030, email me at kolbb@assembly.state.ny.us and find me by searching for Assemblyman Brian Kolb on Facebook and follow me on Twitter.

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